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New Hedge

I have just had that whopping Leylandi hedge removed.

Thanks for all of your help so far.

After some research, we have decided to go with a Beech or Hornbeam, we want privacy and something that we can easily keep under control, I don't want it to go over the boundary line.   

Some questions I can't find answers to online:   

Is it advisable to go for 2 rows of plants to get the privacy or is this overkill? 

Have been told that the Leylandi will have ruined the soil.  I'm assuming I have to remove all of the ruined soil from the border (am assuming it will look powdery)?  Can I use the powdery soil elsewhere or should it be removed from the site?  I have an area where I want to sow grass seed.  

People, keep stopping to tell me that I could get around grinding the Leylandi stumps out and plant between?  Now the hedge is down I can see that they are quite far apart (see pics) what do you think? 

Any help gratefully received.


Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,463
    I'd reckon you can plant inbetween those - they're a good distance apart. You could add some well rotted manure and/or compost before planting the new hedge. The most important thing is to keep anything well watered until established
    You can do a double row if you wish. It may be easier as you have the stumps to contend with. If they weren't there, you could simply plant at around 18 inch to 2 feet distances. I've done that with Hornbeam, and it quickly forms a good dense screen.  :)

    Beech might thrive better than Hornbeam, as it generally prefers a drier spot anyway. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,632
    Beech for dry soils.  Hornbeam for wet.

    No need to remove the soil, just replace the nutrients and improve the texture with lots of well-rotted garden compost and manure or buy some cheap multi-purpose compost and spread that one thickly.

    Agree with Fgirl about planting between the stumps.  You can buy whips (single stemmed plants) with bare roots fairly cheaply and plant them 18" apart in two staggered zig zag rows or be patient and just plant one row 12" apart.  Cut them all down to 9 to 12" at planting time and water well.   They should grow thick and strong if kept watered in dry spells.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,463
    Perfect time of year for getting bareroot whips too . November is the start of the season :)

    A wee bit of prep, and they'll get going well over winter if you get them quite soon. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • The soil isn't ruined. Leylandii don't ruin soil or drain it of it's "goodness", old housewive's tale.

    Just dig in some proper compost, add a bit of powder feed if you want. Plant around those stumps in a staggered row, 4-5 whips per metre. Keep well watered. 
  • IHateWeedingIHateWeeding Posts: 49
    edited October 2019
    Thanks so much for your help will save me removing the stumps.

    Any recommendations where I could get bulk supplies of cheap multi-purpose compost.

    Justin


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,463
    Probably try some local suppliers near you Justin. Landscapers etc. Some will be better than others I expect, but perhaps @glasgowdan could guide you with what to look out for  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks @Fairygirl

    I will check locally.

    I'm assuming I should dig a trench removing what roots I can and work in some compost, but not sure how big the channel would need to be to accommodate 2 rows of plants?

    Also how much compost would you order, the hedge is 30 meters long.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,632
    You don't need to work the compost in the whole bed.   Put a good thick layer if it all along your planting trench area then put in the whips.  Then add a whole layer of compost along the entire width and length of the border.   You want about minimum 10cms for this last layer (30 x .1 x width) plus the length and width of your trench multiplied by 10cms so just do the maths and come up with a cubic measurement.  It'll probably be cheaper to have a small truck load delivered than buy it in 70litre bags.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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