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What's going on with my ivy?

It's been having brown tips since I think late spring this year which has eventually led to complete browning of some stems and all the leaves on them. I've already lost a half of the plant because of this. I was told at a plant nursery that it had something to do with fungus so over this several month period I sprayed the ivy with a ready-made fungicide two or three times (not consecutive though), as well as with an all-purpose insecticide (not at the same time). I guess I need to mention that since June 2019 I've moved this plant three times to different outside locations with one being a balcony with a lot of sun and the other two don't get direct sun at all - I live in Spain so the climate permits, and my apartment is very dark. Recently I've also noticed that the baby plant from this parent plant which I repotted in March is starting to get those brown edges too.. Right now both plants are in different places. 
I've read about all the issues of ivies but the one that I'm having is a mystery to me. I think water issues would be visible in a different way. I'm a beginner plant parent and at lost about what's going with these two. 

Thank you!

P.S. The photos are of the same ivy plant taken in two different locations: the first picture was taken yesterday, the rest in the summer.

Posts

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 18,466
    Some of my plants (SW France) had scorched leaves this summer, was 40°, they looked a bit like that. Ivy grows best in shade. Were the plants in the shade the same as the ones in the sun? Could they be too wet or too dry?
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,292
    I think that's most likely sun scorch. Also, on balconies, they can catch the wind which also causes scorched foliage, even if you don't think it's terribly windy.
    They will also drop leaves which is perfectly normal. All evergreen plants do.  :)

    If you can  put a physical barrier of some kind out there for them, that might help. Some purpose made netting isn't very attractive though, but perhaps you could get a simple bamboo screen or similar which would just take the edge off a bit, especially at the hottest parts of the day. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • svet01svet01 Posts: 6
    edited October 2019
    Some of my plants (SW France) had scorched leaves this summer, was 40°, they looked a bit like that. Ivy grows best in shade. Were the plants in the shade the same as the ones in the sun? Could they be too wet or too dry?
    Thank you. The thing is that the baby ivy plant which has been outside for 4-5 months in a place that never gets direct sun, started to get brown tips too. This bigger one first was on a sunny balcony, then in the patios with no direct sun and now it’s back on the balcony. 
  • svet01svet01 Posts: 6
    Fairygirl said:
    I think that's most likely sun scorch. Also, on balconies, they can catch the wind which also causes scorched foliage, even if you don't think it's terribly windy.
    They will also drop leaves which is perfectly normal. All evergreen plants do.  :)

    If you can  put a physical barrier of some kind out there for them, that might help. Some purpose made netting isn't very attractive though, but perhaps you could get a simple bamboo screen or similar which would just take the edge off a bit, especially at the hottest parts of the day. 
    Thanks for the input. Now that I googled ‘scorched foliage’, it looks similar to what’s happening with my ivies. The only thing that puzzles me is that the baby ivy which has been in an outside patio without direct sun at all is starting to get brown tips too... Can it be that the leave scorch is caused by low humidity, over-fertilization or something else apart from the direct sun?
  • svet01svet01 Posts: 6
    My first thought would be too dry an atmosphere - keeping the compost damp is fine but dry air ( and sun scorch in your first location ) won't help.
    Not really a good idea to spray fungicide/insecticide unless you are sure what you are spraying against.
    Ivies can certainly be grown in Spain but like any plant still require certain conditions to ensure they remain healthy.
    Not a lot of help I'm afraid - sorry :)


    Thank you for the input. That actually makes sense.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,292
    It could be. I certainly wouldn't be giving it a lot of food. They look like very small plants, and ivy doesnt really need anything to keep it going. 
    If they're in a good, free draining soil,  they should be cope with plenty of water too, so overwatering isn't likely to be a problem. If they get waterlogged, you need to check that the holes in the pots aren't being blocked up by the soil.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 4,238
    A hot wind could also crisp the leaf edges , so being in the shade wouldn't protect it. 🤔
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