Rosa Nitida or Virginiana for a hedge

Would love some help, please: I am planning to plant a small area up with Rosa Nitida ( the shining rose) . It would be very close to my patio. The rose (apparently)has a habit of sending suckers but is also listed by David Austin as good for a border. Will it send runners everywhere and become a nusaince or shall I go ahead a plant it. Hopefully photos will attach too. Aleksandra 

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  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 2,433
    ...are you sure you want either?   ..whilst R. nitida is the smaller of the two, rarely much  more than 2 foot or so, it's excessively thorny and you want this right next to a path?... this is without its suckering habits...

    ...I deem that border unsuitable for R. virginiana which is much larger at 5 foot or so and wider... not very thorny which is a bonus but it will also sucker freely...
    ..if these roses are grafted onto rootstock then you may be able to contain it somewhat by raising the graft union about 2 inches above soil level but vigilance would be necessary..

    ...in my opinion, that border is only suitable for a small dwarf box hedge or similar... 

    ...another point is that the rose sold as R. nitida may not be the original... some lesser hybrids are doing the rounds posing as this rose... evidenced by a more vigorous erect habit... such as I see in your picture... 
  • Thank you for your answer. It is exactly what I feared and didn’t want to hear! The thorns, height and size of r.nitida would have still been my choice but my main worry was its suckering habit. What if I lined the trench with weed membrane!? Do you think they would still escape and pop up everywhere? 
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 2,433
    ...one of the reasons people grow this rose is because it forms a thicket... it's what they are looking for...  do you know if your rose is grafted or is it on its own roots?   as I said if it's grafted you could try and plant it with the crown well above the soil... but it will probably layer itself too... when branches touch the ground they root..
    ...it's clearly a rose you've been wanting.... I think you should go with your heart and plant it, and manage it as and when you need to do so...

    … we all learn by our mistakes and sometimes you just have to make them but as long as you don't let it get beyond your personal control, that's the main thing...   best of luck.. the foliage is beautiful...
  • I don’t think it’s grafted. The developer planted them in blocks on our very new estate and also a couple in my front garden. With some hebes. I fell in love with their autumnal colours and decided to plant them in a prettier position, so I  lifted them ... and spotted the suckers. The likely reason that they haven’t yet spread is the hard, baked clay of a new build. They looked potbound with roots going round in circles. Anyway. Your advice is much appreciated, but maybe a less central location will be a better spot for them :) 
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