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Another petition: Ban peat compost for garden use

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  • FireFire LondonPosts: 11,607
    All the consensus I have seen is to use up all currently excavated resources fully and keep the unmined stuff in the ground - Use up current plastics don't create more.
  • CrazybeeladyCrazybeelady WarwickshirePosts: 284
    I was buying compost the other day, looking for peat free, and I saw some claiming to be organic which confused me. Would that mean it's peat free?? I decided against buying it and bought something labelled as peat free, but "organic" does imply "good".
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 10,155
    Organic is a much abused term; crude oil is strictly organic.
    Southern trees bear a strange fruit
    Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 11,607
    Some products in the gardening world seem to use 'organic' as meaning opposite to 'mineral'.
  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 959
    edited 2 April
    I try and only buy peat free MPC, the likes of new horizon are decent value on multi-buy offers and I've had no issues with results. Have used enough of it in large dahlia containers to reach that verdict.

    It's when needing a soil based John Innes compost for a long term container it becomes difficult to get peat free. I think if manufacturers were forced to come up with good alternatives then more availability will come to the market.
  • Mary370Mary370 Limerick, Ireland Posts: 2,003
    What's actually happened here is that since the ban , we are now importing peat and peat briquettes........ double standards, eh?
    Question........why do we use mpc, peat free or not, anyway?  Would it not be better to use bagged topsoil?  
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 6,746
    Just for context, this was originally posted in October 2019, the month before the EU declared a climate emergency covering all member states. In November 2019 the Oxford Dictionaries declared 'Climate Emergency' to be word of the year.


    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • Mike AllenMike Allen Posts: 202
    Alchemist said:
    I still use peat based compost but last 2 years I’ve also been trying wool
    compost on the advice of a person (HW-Hyde) I met at a show and it’s been great. Last year I did not re pot my lillies, strawberries, bush raspberries etc and they all did really well. And this year the toms were grand compared to a peat based compost (Humax grow bag) Downside is that they are not cheap. However they also do a 2x compost that you can mix with used compost and works well making it a bit more economical- just commented on another post btw. 

    This sadly is one of those subjects that will go on and on, as so many matters do.  Richard Hyde is a friend of mine and is responsible for Lily culture.  He uses some Dale composts, I believe.  These composts contain wool and similar products.
    Perhaps we should consider why, in this case.Peat is the topic of conversation.  Scientifically it is accepted as a moisture retainer.  Also it has been found that it traps harmful gases and pollutants.  So as the world is argy-barging about global warming and air pollution, what do we do.  Basically, peat has only one beneficial factor for horticulture.  It retains moisture.  So in todays world, we have discovered that other comodities will also retain moisture and are useful in gardening.  Pearlite for instace.  Cheap to buy, it acts as an aid to drainage in the soil/composts, and at the same time.  It retains moisture.  Coire, is another asset.  Cheap, easy to use and can be used on it's own or added to other composts.  So for the gardener.  To stop using peat, is not the end of the world.  As I said to start with.  This is one of those subjects that will go on and on.  To wait for government legelation.   How long has it taken the governing powers to identify the hazzards of plastic and landfil sites?
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 5,736
    I was buying compost the other day, looking for peat free, and I saw some claiming to be organic which confused me. Would that mean it's peat free?? I decided against buying it and bought something labelled as peat free, but "organic" does imply "good".

    It will be true and totally meaningless at the same time.  Much like comments by many politicians. :D
    Dictionary definition of organic - "relating to or derived from living matter."

  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 2,003
    edited 3 April
    Organic on compost probably means that the added plant food in it is organic and the compost is suitable for growing plants organically.

    Anyway, I decided to be brave this year and buy some peat-free compost to try it. And I've made a mistake and bought twice as much as I wanted. So now I hope my plants will survive in it... it doesn't look bad but the watering etc. will be a learning curve. I've still bought some peat-based compost, mostly because I need someone for germinating seeds and it is said to be better for germination.
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