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Another petition: Ban peat compost for garden use

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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,887
    punkdoc said:
    Compared with power stations, gardeners use very little peat, so if they make an effort, so will I.
    I am not convinced how much effort is being put into looking for a good alternative for gardeners.
    I concur.
    Devon.
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,466
    Hostafan1 said:
    LG_ said:
    I have no doubt that they're charging more because they can get away with it. If peat-based compost was restricted or even banned and peat-free became the norm, that would soon stop. In fact, perhaps some kind of eco-tax added to all peat-based products would do the trick. 
    but it's still not as good. IMHO.
    Maybe if it was as good, then we'd all have swapped by now. 
    Which ones did you try? And more important - how recently? Did none come close at all? 
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 29,887
    LG_ said:
    Hostafan1 said:
    LG_ said:
    I have no doubt that they're charging more because they can get away with it. If peat-based compost was restricted or even banned and peat-free became the norm, that would soon stop. In fact, perhaps some kind of eco-tax added to all peat-based products would do the trick. 
    but it's still not as good. IMHO.
    Maybe if it was as good, then we'd all have swapped by now. 
    Which ones did you try? And more important - how recently? Did none come close at all? 
    I've not bought the compost , but every plant I buy which boasts " peat free compost" needs watering much more often. Maybe water conservation isn't so important.
    Devon.
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 3,466
    Ah I see - so there might be ones that *are* as good, after all :-). They do vary hugely, and a couple that I've tried have been cr*p - and yes, dried out very quickly. But others have been excellent - it's probably worth you giving it another go, but look at a few reviews (incl Which?) first. Make them recent reviews though, as the composition does vary.
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,303
    I've got deja vu - didn't we have this thread recently?  :D
    I bought some peat free compost recently, and for the first time. I haven't used it enough to see if it's any good or not. I'll see what I think next year. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • SlumSlum Posts: 334
    Melcourt Sylvagrow is an excellent peat free compost. 
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 15,430
    I'm with Hostafan on this one. 94% burned in power stations, 4% used by gardeners. When the ratio is the other way round, I will stop using it.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • SlumSlum Posts: 334
    Some things I can control, some I can’t. I can control what I use in my garden but not what power stations in Ireland burn. I’m happy I’m doing my bit.

    There are plenty of big polluters of the oceans so I just throw my plastic waste into the sea. When they stop, then I will. 😉
  • Fishy65Fishy65 Posts: 2,267
    I'm with Hostafan on this one. 94% burned in power stations, 4% used by gardeners. When the ratio is the other way round, I will stop using it.
    What about the other 2% fidgetbones?  :D
  • B3B3 Posts: 19,374
    That would be what people use in their houses probably 
    In London. Keen but lazy.
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