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Gardeners green tax

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,284
    I know what you mean too @Lizzie27. We don't often have containers which have 'stuff' in them, but we did the other day, as daughter brought some reduced goods home. I did the same as you before putting the tray out for use in the garden, but if I wasn't reusing it would have gone in the recycling. Even trays with meat/chicken in them get a good rinse with hot water, so is it really worth doing?
    I suppose the problem is that the bin would be honking by the time it gets collected  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,327
    Fairygirl said:
    I know what you mean too @Lizzie27. We don't often have containers which have 'stuff' in them, but we did the other day, as daughter brought some reduced goods home. I did the same as you before putting the tray out for use in the garden, but if I wasn't reusing it would have gone in the recycling. Even trays with meat/chicken in them get a good rinse with hot water, so is it really worth doing?
    I suppose the problem is that the bin would be honking by the time it gets collected  ;)
    I think a rinse is good enough to save the point you made about a honking recycle bin.  Plus assorted nastiness at the bottom, and attracting the attention of foxes!
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 34,284
    It's something I've always done @Tin pot, even before we had proper recycling. I don't really think about it - just something I do. If we have a bowlful of washing up on the go, I swish them in that.  :)
    The foxes are enough of a bl**dy nuisance without encouraging them  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,494
    Rarely have rubbish but if I do it just goes in the washing up bowl with rest. 
    Our rubbish is emptied once a fortnight, I missed it last week so it will be a month before collection,  only have one small  bag a fortnight so it’s in the garage away from foxes
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 5,858
    I won't bother with really baked on food debris again - it will have to go in the general non-recycling bin.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,165
    Waitrose are now using "trays" which they say can be home composted.
    Devon.
  • For the first time ever, I have made use of a Garden Waste wheelie Bin - collected fortnightly for 9 months of the year it costs £57 pa.  This allows me to cut down my trips to the tip with Bramble, Ash and Ivy.  With a very overgrown and neglected garden to deal with, it seemed a reasonable solution.  I hope to cancel the bin in the next 12 months.  Despite compost bins and shredder, the volume of green waste which couldn't be easily composted was just excessive to deal with.
    Food waste (which is minimal) is collected every week and goes to a digester plant.  The likes of cardboard, paper, glass, etc. are also collected every week.
    General rubbish ( ie non recyclable ) is collected on a fortnightly basis ( soon to be reduced to 3 weekly ).  Confess I'm pushed to fill a rubbish wheelie every month let alone every fortnight.
    Not trying to make a particular point but there are obviously enormous differences throughout the UK with regard to recycling, collections and charges.  One would have thought that it wasn't beyond the authorities concerned to have something approaching an overall policy.
    Oh silly me - that's a bit too logical perhaps !   
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 3,182
    I must admit I do manage to fill both the black and recycled bins in two weeks. But we dont have separate food or cardboard or glass collection. The green bin I could fill every week if I tried( its every two weeks)
  • chicky said:
    I have to admit to having conflicting thoughts about home composting now.  Went to a (deliberately) provocative talk at HC flower show, where the Chief Scientist at the RHS came out as an anti-home composter.  The reason they don’t like green waste going to landfill is that when it decomposes it creates methane (much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2).  Mr RHS argued that home composting on a small domestic scale creates just as much methane.  Whereas green waste composting on a council size scale is done in controlled (anaerobic) conditions, that stop waste gases being produced.  So should we ALL be sending our green waste to council facilities ?

    Still have my compost heap, and there’s something about the transport emissions of collecting it all then redistributing it as soil improver ......  but it did get me thinking 🤔 
    Methane and CO2 (biogases) are  produced from anaerobic decomposition. Hence anaerobic digesters being used on farms and other facilities to fuel CHP.
    Proper home composting and facility composting by windrow and IVC methodologies i.e. with sufficient air circulation is aerobic. 

  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,425
    I did some work for a guy who designed the finishing work for landfill sites before they get restored to nature reserves and the like. He reckoned that the companies had invested heavily in methane capture systems for energy production but the increased food waste recycling was really reducing the amount of gas they could collect.
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