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Foxglove help

I grew some digitalis purpurea from seed this year, sown in april/may I cant remember exactly when, but they've decided they went to start flowering now. Any ideas why, and how I can avoid this in future as I want summer blooms. Should I sow some now for next year or is it too late?

Thanks. 

Posts

  • AstroAstro Posts: 292
    I did something similar myself and started some earlier, February in fact and one flowered earlier than I wanted.
     The best time to start the seeds is when they would naturally drop them, which would be during mid to late summer. Not sure if sowing now would be ideal because  we're into autumn. Sure someone will advise.
  • Presumably you've sown them directly into the ground?  You could try one of the following:
    1. Sow them somewhere sunny and warm so they germinate earlier and grow faster, therefore flowering sooner.
    2. Sow them into pots in a greenhouse or inside.  This allows you to sow them earlier as the soil is warmer.  You can then transfer them into the ground (still somewhere sunny).
  • Presumably you've sown them directly into the ground?  You could try one of the following:
    1. Sow them somewhere sunny and warm so they germinate earlier and grow faster, therefore flowering sooner.
    2. Sow them into pots in a greenhouse or inside.  This allows you to sow them earlier as the soil is warmer.  You can then transfer them into the ground (still somewhere sunny).
    Nope I sowed them into pots then planted them out in July!

    I may sow some now and overwinter them in coldframe. Then sow some more in Jan/feb in coldframe and see what happens! 
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,629
    Foxgloves can act as perennial plants so don't write them off just because they've flowered. You could cut the flowering spikes off to divert some energy back into root growth and they might flower again next year.
  • Foxgloves can act as perennial plants so don't write them off just because they've flowered. You could cut the flowering spikes off to divert some energy back into root growth and they might flower again next year.
    Do you think I should cut them off now? 
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,833
    I don’t let mine flower in the first year. I would cut them off. You need to get a nice root build up for the winter.  
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Lyn said:
    I don’t let mine flower in the first year. I would cut them off. You need to get a nice root build up for the winter.  
    Okay will do! I may let one or two flower now for a bit of autumn interest. 
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