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LEYLANDI STUMPS

 I,ve just taken the foliage of a leylandi hedge and am left with a row of trunks approx 7 ft high in a good straight line. Could I use these to support a wood boarding fence built to purpose. How long will the trunks last?

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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,315
    texaxa said:
     I,ve just taken the foliage of a leylandi hedge and am left with a row of trunks approx 7 ft high in a good straight line. Could I use these to support a wood boarding fence built to purpose. How long will the trunks last?
    IMHO it'll just look like a bunch of tree stumps, and not attractive in any way. 
    I'd do the job properly and remove them completely and have your fence installed.
    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135
    I'd agree with @Hostafan1 - and also, the trunks will eventually rot. How long that takes is difficult to estimate.
    Usually , using the trunks as a lever, they can be removed relatively easily. It largely depends on your abilities to do it yourself, or with some help, or your budget to get someone else to do it. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Valley GardenerValley Gardener Rhondda ValleyPosts: 2,703
    We had 11 Leylandii felled two years ago,too many to dig out roots,but I grew ferns around the stumps for camouflage. 
    They are just starting to rot,bits peeling down the sides etc. So I don't think they would hold a fence for many years. 
    The whole truth is an instrument that can only be played by an expert.
  • hi
    they cannot be removed as it would break up the councill path ( about 150ft )from the council path side it would look neat with  vertical closed  board and no stumps showing,would have to work to work at my side to get it looking neat, my main concern is would the roots of the stumps rot away , how long would they remain solid as they are now,
    thanks
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,574
    Not very long as the wood is soft, as opposed to slow growing hard wood like oak.  If you cant pull or wiggle them out without disturbing the path, chop the trunks down to soil level and then scrape back soil at their base and use loppers or a pruning saw on the roots to break them up a bit or just leave them to rot in th esoil.  They'll provide food and shelter for all sorts of wee critters and soil organisms.

    Erect proper, sturdy fence posts to support a decent fence that will last.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Don't use stumps as a fence!!! It'll NEVER look good. Get them cut to ground level then hire a stump grinder to take them down below ground. Then build a proper fence
  • they'll last two maybe three years as fence posts and then they'll snap off a ground level as its the roots that rot off, best bet is take them to the ground (or below if you can- stump grinders are great!) drill loads of holes in them and bury them in soil, if you can put up a fence with a gravel kick board and you can get a decent depth of soil on top of them and plant it up.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 49,135
    Think  we're all singing from the same hymnbook here @texaxa
    @treehugger80's idea is probably the best, given the proximity of the path, unless you can get a grinder in easily.
    Difficult without seeing how it actually looks though. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 33,315
    Fairygirl said:
    Think  we're all singing from the same hymnbook here @texaxa
    @treehugger80's idea is probably the best, given the proximity of the path, unless you can get a grinder in easily.
    Difficult without seeing how it actually looks though. 
    OP has said it's next to a council pavement, so shouldn't be any problem with a stump grinder.
    Devon.
  • thanks for all the comments and advice, i am liking this web site
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