Having a purge!!!

madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 1,567
I am taking stock of lots of my plants this year,especially some shrubs in pots.
Some I have had for several years and they never seem to perform well but I still repot and try and find a place for them.
There is no room in the garden itself and lots of pots means lots of watering (which I am not good at) and with too many pots I trip over them!!
Quite cathartic to finally get rid of of plants that I have kept too long.
It also frees up some big pots for nicer plants that are currently in pots too small.
Anyone else do this?
“Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
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  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,245
    I had a bit of a brutal clearout this year but still seemed to end up with more plants in pots. Partly because of having to do so much repotting after vine weevil grub attacks and partly to make spare plants so I wouldn't lose any to weevil grubs. I also have loads on plants that I failed to plant out or didn't have space to plant out this year. I can't even give any away until I'm sure the pots aren't full of weevil eggs. I think this winter I'm going to clear some big areas of the garden and plant out as much as possible to give myself more time next year to enjoy the garden and go back to growing more food.
  • I have a long, narrow garden with shallow soil so most of my plants are in pots.  I buy a plant, have to buy a pot and compost and so it goes.  I now have about 50 pots but I find it hard to discard even the stragglers.  Determined to be ruthless next year.
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 1,567
    It is difficult to get rid of a plant if you have had it a long time but it does free up pots and space for something that may perform better and bring some pleasure.
    I love Sempervivum and succulents and am also trying to get the garden to be able to look after itself in hot weather without watering.
    I actually went away for a week during the August heatwave and came home to plants that were still thriving!
    Also not taking cuttings or saving plant divisions unless it is something that a friend etc has expressed a interest!
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,284
    In smaller gardens, plants need to earn their keep, so you have to be selective. In big gardens, you need more plants anyway, so having lots of back up is necessary. I've had to keep lots of cuttings and bits and pieces here, as I've developed the garden from virtually nothing. Adding an extension meant creating other planting areas too, but I'm now at the stage where, if I can't use it, or I don't need it - it's out.
    I do the same indoors - if it ain't getting used, it ain't getting kept. In fact - if the two girls don't start earning their keep....
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 1,567
    I think a lot of people like to have as many different plants as possible in their gardens,I know I did,but sometimes gardens,especially small ones,look better with fewer plants but ones that always look good.
    Ostespermum jucundum var. compactum and Sedum confusum both do really well in my garden and grow where not much else will so have planted them all over the place!
    My indoor succulent collection is also being reduced.Trying not to have things which all look too similar and concentrating on the unusual varieties.No more Money plant cuttings instead taking cuttings of rare plants which is actually more satisfying when they take.
    As I get older (though not yet in my dotage!) I want to be able to sit and relax a bit in my garden and am altering planting so I can 'get someone in' to see to it if I cannot.
    Had to take on more of my Mum's garden as she is 86 and I can see now where things can get difficult if you cannot do it yourself.
    But this is also part of the joy of gardening,constantly changing and adapting so you can still enjoy it so it does not become a chore!
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • B3B3 Posts: 10,002
    I've done for a load of lillies. They've been replaced with temporary violas while I have a think.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • B3B3 Posts: 10,002
    There's a peony on the death list. It's the bog standard one with magenta -ish flowers. It gets about 3or 4 flowers a year and then boring leaves the rest if the year.  The judge has donned the black cap😟
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,284
    I think they like more moisture than the others @B3.
    They dont mind wetter conditions and a bit of a shadier spot. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • B3B3 Posts: 10,002
    I'll bung it in the shade near the compost heap then. It'll be handy if it doesn't do😉  @Fairygirl
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 2,252
    I’m having a purge of salvia caradonna, got far too much of it, flowers for a too short time and the foliage looks really scruffy late on. All roses in pots are going, along with most of the DA roses in my too hot for them hot border. I have to do it surreptitiously as OH hates to junk anything, even when clearly not performing.
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