Grass too long to mow!

Hi all, I decided to stop mowing part of the garden, to let it rewild.  I didn't realise that you have to still mow now and again, so now have foot high grass with random weeds!  As it's constantly wet and windy here (west of Ireland) It just lies in wet clumps so can't use the mower.  Will it die back in winter, given that we seldom get frost?  Help, please.
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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 15,273
    No, it will fall over and provide a thatch for young tree seedlings. These in turn will provide shelter for larger plants. After several years, you will have a thicket and after that a wood.

    OK if you want a wood.

    Or you could strim it and then mow it.



    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • glasgowdanglasgowdan Posts: 553
    Take the bag off your mower,  prop the flap open with something, and mow it on the highest setting. The grass will fly out all over your feet and you can then rake up. It's easier than strimming
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 4,891
    Don't know if you have hedgehogs in your area, but please check for any wildlife before mowing or strimming it  :)
  • Very good point.  In 30 years here, only once have I seen a hedgehog but I will certainly check for any wildlife.
  • Hi Glasgowdan, 
    Was thinking of borrowing a sheep but will try your approach.  Main problem here is rain, not the lawnmowers friend.
  • HexagonHexagon Posts: 874
    I love the idea that you could borrow a sheep! 
  • bullfinchbullfinch Posts: 204
    Yes, I loved Adam's new lawnmowers on GW this week🐑 😊
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 26,748
    Here you are @katiem111

     :D 
    I used to do the same as @glasgowdan suggests, at a previous house, as it was a big area to cut, and it was easier than constantly emptying the box. The wind blew it all away quite quickly too  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Ha ha, thanks for all the replies!  No shortage of sheep in these parts fairygirl but thanks for the offer.  Husband is going to tackle it at the weekend if the rain holds off. My vision of a bee friendly meadow was well wide of the mark but have my daffs and tulips all set to plant once the grass is gone so will see what spring brings.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 26,748
    I think if you want a wildflower meadow, or similar, you need to remove the grass and then start from scratch with that. If there's a strong growth of grass, that will be the dominant plant, and it'll result in the issue you have.
    You have to work out the best plants for your conditions, scrape/remove the grass  as best you can, and then plant or sow seed accordingly. Yellow rattle is the thing to use to help prevent grass regrowing strongly.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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