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Evergreen climbers or wall shrubs

We have an old grey stone farmhouse in Snowdonia. I’ve just planted some Chinese Creeping Virginia up the wall by the front door to make it look a bit less austere and to add some colour. But I have a big gap under the front window, that I want to grow something that will be evergreen and also maybe add some colour. I was thinking pyracantha but my husband hates it! So I’m looking for ideas for a wall shrub of some description, maybe. I also want to find another climber to weave amongst the Virginia creeper that will hold its leaves in the winter after the Virginia loses its leaves. I’m thinking maybe an ivy...it’s north facing and will get some fairly strong winds! Any ideas would be great.
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,134
    Japanese Quince [ Chaenomeles] for under the window, would be my choice, although it isn't evergreen. Or Osmanthus if you want evergreen.

    I personally wouldn't put anything with the Virginia creeper.  You'll miss seeing the beautiful foliage unfurling in spring if you cover it with ivy.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Euonymus?
    Slow, easy to prune.
    I thought this one looked superb.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,134
    Good shout @Silver surfer   :)
    Easy to maintain and grow too.
    When I was out this afternoon, Cotoneaster came to my mind. The evergreen ones are very straightforward and can be encouraged to form a shape too, although it's better if they have a basic frame to grow on, which you can then clip and trim against if needed. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    Japanese Quince [ Chaenomeles] for under the window, would be my choice, although it isn't evergreen. Or Osmanthus if you want evergreen.

    I personally wouldn't put anything with the Virginia creeper.  You'll miss seeing the beautiful foliage unfurling in spring if you cover it with ivy.
    ah thanks! Yes, I think I really want evergreen as winter is when it will really look bleak. Osmanthus is a good idea, thank you for that :) if I don't put anything with the virginia creeper though, I just have a bare twiggy wall after the first autumn storm...perhaps I could find something evergreen but a little less vigorous than ivy...
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,134
    @pinklara - you could try looking at alpina clematis. Taylors, Thorncroft and Hawthornes all have huge ranges on their online sites  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • The euonymus looks beautiful! And there seems to be a few nice types to choose from :) also the cotoneaster, as it would be great to have christmassy-looking berries once it gets cold. Hmm, decisions...with the cotoneaster, would I get one of the low growing varieties and let it creep up the wall just a little? Or do you think I should get one of the upright ones and try to make a more formal hedge?
  • Fairygirl said:
    @pinklara - you could try looking at alpina clematis. Taylors, Thorncroft and Hawthornes all have huge ranges on their online sites  :)
    oh pretty! are any evergreen though? Or will I have the bare twiggy winter problem still?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,134
    edited September 2019
    The alpinas come into leaf quite early - not sure where you are, but ours are around March, so a bit earlier further south. There are evergreen clems anyway though. Have a browse at those sites and see if any will suit. You can always contact them directly for help too  :)
    Most cotoneasters will grow 'up' if against a wall, however not all are evergreen, so you'd need to choose carefully.
    I have C.lacteus which is evergreen, against a fence near my back door, wihch provides a backdrop for spring clematis. The birds also don't eat the berries so they stay there for along time. They're colouring up well now.  However, it does become huge, so you'd need to keep an eye on it. It's easy enough to remove branches and stems now and again though. 

    Found a pic from November 2 years ago

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • that's lovely @Fairygirl, lots of colour for November. We are in North Wales so I guess not too dissimilar from your climate but a little warmer. I'll look into the winter clematis too, might not work on that wall as north-facing but might be good for our kitchen wall :) thanks for your help!
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,134
    There are many clems which are perfectly happy in north facing sites, so I'm sure you'll find something to suit.  :)
    There's bound to be some annuals which will grow in the site you need colour for - don't dismiss sweet peas - they grow really well in shady sites here  :)
    I think you could try nasturtiums too [ trailing from wall baskets etc] - despite the info that they need sun, it's like sweet peas - they always say full sun for those too ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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