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why is mostly the slugs that get a bad press?

The slugs seem to be  one of the more discussed pests and products marketed as slug rings, slug killer, slug nematodes. The snails don't seem to be so villified, but aren't they as bad?

Although I've started growing plants the slugs don't favour, is it the same for the snails? 
Nematodes aren't effective and I don't use any pellets. I have only had some heliopsis eaten this year which I think is snails as I have had few slugs.
And I also understand that most slugs eat rotting material and very few attack plants; is this right?
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,744
    berarde said:

    And I also understand that most slugs eat rotting material and very few attack plants; is this right?
    No  :)
    You often find it's the tiny ones which do the most damage though.

    We have copious amounts of all types, especially large snails. They're jsut easier to spot  :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,559
    Nematodes are very effective, you have to apply correctly and at the right time. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,072
    I find slugs tend to go for low growing plants and snails like to climb taller things for their dinner.  Most of the holes in my various clematis and magnolia tree leaves were caused by snails.  Nematodes are very effective as Lyn mentions but it's a myth that they don't kill snails as they DO (slugs and snails are closely related enough.)  The problem really is in infecting the snails as they generally stay on the surface and 'sleep' in dry places (where nematodes cannot live), whereas slugs stay below ground or in damp places when not feeding and these are the exact same conditions where nematodes can survive.  I have no doubt that if you watered nematodes directly onto snails that they would become infected.  The problem is that the only way to do that is to see them with your eyes, at which point you may as well just pick them off by hand.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,000
    Snails are much easier to pick up (by the shell) and hurl into your least favourite neighbour's garden. (Therapeutic).
  • B3B3 Posts: 18,774
    You got there before me @WillDB! Only I drop and stamp. A quick despatch .
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 39,744
    Being adjacent to the road, and instead of stomping, I sometimes let the big snails  play the lottery - with the cars....
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • FireFire LondonPosts: 10,954
    I don't find nematodes at all effective - I did a controlled trial this spring. Different slugs eat different things and at different time. Leopard slugs seems to eat mostly other slugs and rotting vegetation. Something like a Spanish slug loves to eat anything. Slugs get a bad press because they eat the gardeners' time and money. Often, if you can get young plants large enough, they will survive some chomping. Other times slugs can raze large plants to the ground overnight. All very frustrating.
  • WillDB said:
    Snails are much easier to pick up (by the shell) and hurl into your least favourite neighbour's garden. (Therapeutic).
    But they come back (though it takes 'em a while :))!
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 10,954
    They have a three mile homing response.
  • AstroAstro Posts: 328
    What are peoples general thoughts on using sacrificial plants? I've heard of people growing extra lettuce and using hostas for this purpose. I found letting the slugs and snails eat for example runner bean leaves, Peruvian Daffodil and even a particular dahlia they have pretty much stayed at their favourites. They are easier to find on an evening as a result too.  
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