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Fungus/disease??

Anybody know what this is and what may have caused it? ?

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,232
    edited August 2019
    To be honest, I’m not sure what I’m looking at.

    Is the black stuff the problem or is it the white stuff that’s on the black stuff or is it both the black stuff and the white stuff that’s on it? 
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 631
    edited August 2019
    A white mould, maybe sclerotinia, due to persistent wetness. 
  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 571
    It looks like wood chips which have grown fungus or mould. The first picture shows a rather pretty fern, the second some reedy grass ( I would call it a weed) and the green bits on the third is weed. My front garden was covered in bark when we moved in. It wasn't as 'new' as what seems to have been used on your garden, but over time, mine grew white fungus/mould which smelled of mushrooms. Because the shrubs were likely to be changed, I simply dug the bark in. It has improved the soil and hasn't caused any problems. Yours look less rotted than mine were so digging them in might not work as well. If you want to be rid of the mouldy bits just pick them off. I would keep the fern, remove the reedy grass and the weeds. The  'mulch' has been in a warm moist place which has encouraged the growth of the fungus/mould. It's quite possible that you wont change the conditions so bark chippings are always likely to go the same way.
  • Apologies if the photos didn’t make much sense?! The first pic is a fern surrounded by a white mould. The second is a grass (not weed) and has the same mould growing at the base. The third pic is an alpine plant that has pretty much been destroyed the white mould (it was a healthy green alpine a week a go). The wood chip is fairly new and so has possibly caused the mould?!.. Probably should have waited for it to break down a bit more before adding to the bed. Thanks for responses and thanks for your suggestion Helix about the possible name of the fungus/mould. Shall have a read up!
  • It is advisable to take preventive measures against diseases likely to attack your trees in a reasonable time. This will help keep your tree sustainable and fruitful.

    Just as you take cognisance of your body and environmental hygiene, your trees also require good health to survive. Biosecurity is vital to the prevention of the spread of tree diseases.

    Furthermore, you should always disinfect and clean tools, footwear, and vehicles during movement between sites. As regards ash trees that have been planted for about five years, frequently inspect them to ensure that they are free from any disease.

    Maintenance of a good surrounding that is free of dead branches and leaves should be a priority so that fungi will not have the opportunity to grow.

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,869

    It is advisable to take preventive measures against diseases likely to attack your trees in a reasonable time. This will help keep your tree sustainable and fruitful.

    Just as you take cognisance of your body and environmental hygiene, your trees also require good health to survive. Biosecurity is vital to the prevention of the spread of tree diseases.

    Furthermore, you should always disinfect and clean tools, footwear, and vehicles during movement between sites. As regards ash trees that have been planted for about five years, frequently inspect them to ensure that they are free from any disease.

    Maintenance of a good surrounding that is free of dead branches and leaves should be a priority so that fungi will not have the opportunity to grow.

    some of us are more interested in biodiversity than biosecurity
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