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Something dense and fragrant

I've just built this raised planter. Unfortunately, the wood is all from the very centre of the tree and now the joints are opening up and it's warping and splitting. Grrrrr - no wonder they deliver it to you soaking!

Anyway....



...now I need to think about planting. It's in a pretty sunny spot and I thought a trellis against the wall with something fragrant would be nice. I've got a honeysuckle on the opposite wall that's very straggly so I'd like something that's denser this time and smells great. 

What would you suggest please?
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  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 29,352
    Morning Oliver. Trachelospermum jasminoides might be a suitable plant for you. One of its common names is Star Jasmine.
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 556
    I've got both honeysuckle and Trachelospermum jasminoides in my garden and because the honeysuckle is straggly and has wild looking flowers I'm going to remove the honeysuckle and plant more Tracleospermum. If you want some fairly immediate impact,  buy large. I  could smell mine indoors and it is planted well away from the house. 
  • floraliesfloralies Haute-Garonne SW FrancePosts: 940
    Hello Oliver, before you go any further with planting I would line your planters with thick black liner or old compost bags to help preserve the wood against moisture. The wood will rot much quicker without anything there to protect it. Good luck with the planting it looks very good.
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,376
    Dense and fragrant ..... I thought you were talking about me.
  • floralies said:
    Hello Oliver, before you go any further with planting I would line your planters with thick black liner or old compost bags to help preserve the wood against moisture. The wood will rot much quicker without anything there to protect it. Good luck with the planting it looks very good.
    I'm afraid they're full with soil now. The wood is treated. I'll be living here for maybe 10 years max so finger's crossed they'll last that long
  • Ladybird4 said:
    Morning Oliver. Trachelospermum jasminoides might be a suitable plant for you. One of its common names is Star Jasmine.
    Thanks - I'll keep a look out for one of those then.
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 29,352
    You are most welcome.
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,993
    Whereabouts do you live @oliveraustin? Trachelospermum jasminoides/Star jasmine isn't hardy everywhere.

    What are you planning for the other sections of your container?  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    Whereabouts do you live @oliveraustin? Trachelospermum jasminoides/Star jasmine isn't hardy everywhere.

    What are you planning for the other sections of your container?  :)
    We're in Aylesbury, North West of London. 
    The two narrow side bits at the top are for flowers in the summer.
    The bottom currently empty square will be filled (I ran out of soil) and have a resin water feature surrounded by gravel and some stones, some grasses and desert type plants. I planned to perhaps half fill it with well-spaced rubble so it drains really well then a mix of sand and compost, a layer of weed membrane then nice gravel.

    Thoughts on the above? other planting ideas?
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,993
    Should be fine where you are  :)
    You could add some annual sweet peas for extra scent/colour too, if you like them. 
    I think your grasses/water feature would be fine too, and you can always add spring bulbs to extend the season. Some alliums, or a similar vertical, would also add a bit of height and interest among your grasses, without the need for too much attention .  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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