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Hydrangea help!

I have moved this plant to what should have been a better location and fed it with ericaceous food and kept it watered, as required, but it looks to be dying. Can anyone suggest what I can do now. 
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  • yorkshireroseyorkshirerose North YorkshirePosts: 574
    Do you have a photo, please?
    A gardener's work is never at an end  - (John Evelyn 1620-1706)
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,932
    Yes - more info needed @Lyn142:)

    Size, type, soil condition, other planting nearby etc. These can all have a bearing on the health of plants.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Lynn142Lynn142 Posts: 128
    Oops, I thought it had been attached to my initial post (it must have been too big a file) but here it is now. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,932
    I can't see a hydrangea in that pic. Looks like a rhododendron.
    Is it the wrong pic?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 2,307
    That looks like a really unhappy rhododendron...
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,932
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Lynn142Lynn142 Posts: 128
    Our soil is not good as it has lots of clay and is very dry so it doesn’t have good drainage. This last location we thought may be better and we put in lots of ericaceous soil and added ericaceous feed too. We have tried sunny locations but it’s now in a shady one under a large chestnut tree. Any suggestions please are welcome.
  • Lynn142Lynn142 Posts: 128
    Well spotted everyone, it is a rhododendron - I obviously had a ‘senior moment’ when I initially posted this problem! 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,932
    That's ok @Lyn142. We all have them  ;)
    Unfortunately, under the tree will probably produce problems too. It would have helped to add loads of well rotted manure as that helps retain moisture, as well as aiding drainage. Clay is ideal for them though. Adding a mulch [bark is ideal] will help too. 

    I would also prune that back a little if it doesn't perk up. I know many people think [incorrectly] pruning isn't advisable, for rhodies, but when you move them, there's a lot of stress. 
    The ericaceous thing is also a myth - as long as the soil isn't alkaline, they're fine, especially if they have everything else they need. Rainwater is ideal if you don't live in a softwater area too.  Don't feed it either. It's too much for it to cope with.
    Other than that, you'll just have to cross your fingers. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Lynn142Lynn142 Posts: 128
    You’ve given me lots of advice which is much appreciated and thanks for taking the time to reply - sorry about the confusion! 
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