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Mowing new lawn

Hi, we had new turf laid 3 weeks ago onto heavy clay soil. It's getting long, it's looking healthy, but when I give it a tug to see how well it is rooting some areas feel firm, others do not. Obviously I don't want to stress it, but also I don't want it to get too long. Do I mow or leave it? 

Posts

  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 7,642
    I'm no expert but I think I would mow it on the highest setting, making sure the blades are very sharp so they cut cleanly with minimal pulling.
  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 571
    If it isn't firmly rooted,  keep off it. Walking on it too soon, will hinder progress and will likely leave footprints in it. It may take 6 weeks for it to attach itself firmly. When you do mow, JennyJ is right. Be patient!
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 48,889
    What do you mean by long? Unless it's grown extremely quickly in 3 weeks, it can't be more than about five or six inches, unless you're in a very wet area. That isn't a problem to leave at that height, and as JennyJ says, once you cut it, you would cut on the highest setting so that you only take a little off, and then gradually lower it after that. 

    I'd be more concerned that it's not rooting/attaching well in some places. Do those parts look green and healthy?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 571
    Perhaps a photograph would help. 
  • elu439elu439 Posts: 17
    edited August 2019
    Fairygirl said:
    What do you mean by long? Unless it's grown extremely quickly in 3 weeks, it can't be more than about five or six inches, unless you're in a very wet area. That isn't a problem to leave at that height, and as JennyJ says, once you cut it, you would cut on the highest setting so that you only take a little off, and then gradually lower it after that. 

    I'd be more concerned that it's not rooting/attaching well in some places. Do those parts look green and healthy?
    You are right, it is only about 5 inches. That is not too long then? When would I want to worry about light not getting through? Do I even need to worry about that? 

    The parts that are not rooting look very healthy - green, thick and growing well. I don't think the ground was prepared in the best way - it is a housing association house, and the work was done by then while we were on holiday. Before we moved in the garden was FULL of rubbish, and overrun with brambles, which are sprouting through the turf. 
  • elu439elu439 Posts: 17
    Joy* said:
    Perhaps a photograph would help. 

  • elu439elu439 Posts: 17
    edited August 2019
    elu439 said:
    Joy* said:
    Perhaps a photograph would help. 

    The yellow bits are just sunlight through the shadows! 
  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 571
    It looks to be in very good condition.  When we bought our new house, the back garden was a building site on the Tuesday so we didn't expect it to be turfed when we got the keys on Friday.  When we called round on Thursday, the turf was done! We kept off it until it was well rooted before we set foot on it . It doesn't grow much above until it has a decent root system. Don't worry too much about cutting it yet. It is much more important to keep it watered as any dry patches wont take and you will notice the joints separating and curling up. This isn't happening so it is doing well. If you need to get to areas at the back, in order to water it, it would help to put down boards to walk on to spread your weight. It is best if you can water it without walking on it if you can get round it or put pressure on the hose to make the water spray further. You have the beginnings of a really nice lawn. When you do start mowing you will be able to sort it the brambles which hopefully will be weakened by regular decapitation.  :)
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