Half hour gardeners world

24

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,930
    You're right @Fairygirl.   Gardening is great therapy and we all have different ideas and tastes about what and how to plant in our own spaces.   

    My problem with GW is the poor content management.  Earlier in the season it was endless, repetitive jungle gardens and now we seem to be getting container gardens.  Where's the editorial judgement and balance?
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • AstroAstro Posts: 88
    Fairygirl said:
    I'm not ashamed to admit I had a lump in my throat listening to, and watching, that lady I was talking about.
    My experience was that I was going through a very difficult time, and once I delivered my young children to school, the garden was my total salvation. It kept me sane for a very long time until I came out the other end. I've subsequently gone through another difficult stage, and again, creating an outdoor space [and my beloved hills]  saved me.

    The healing properties of just being outside in our wonderful landscapes, urban, rural or otherwise,  are difficult to ignore
    Yes it is good that people can help their mental health through gardening and create a relaxing environment. This idea is a one that is often repeated in gardening circles and is worth repeating some more, as it could attract others to its benefits. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 26,656
    I know what you mean @Obelixx, and as I said - I can't remember much else about the programme, which I think is the basic problem for a lot of people. Repetition.
    For those of us who've been gardening a while, it means there's an awful lot of that, so the programme has become less relevant. 
    I don't know what the answer is, but I suppose the makers feel they have to do something different to appeal to a newer, and wider, audience.
    I expect it's the difficulty with any long running programme [of any type] - you eventually run out of ideas, and it all becomes repetitive, or just a load of random bits glued together. It does seem to have lost it's way over the last few years. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 13,805
    Maybe it had something to do with Monty going to the USA and people being on holiday.
    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,930
    I think they just lose sight of the BBC mission to inform, educate and entertain and fall back on what's cheap and easy.  Monty is the presenter, not the editor or the person who goes out and films other gardens and interviews their cretaors or guardians as the case may be.

    Given the vast resources of gardens in the UK, the ease of finding them thru the yellow book or the RHS and the variations to be found thru the geography and seasons I find it strange that GW's coverage can be so very unimaginative.

    I still find it noteworthy that the pink and orange garden had a pink and orange attired gardener but maybe that struck me most because I had a very similar outfit - minus the bracelets - in 1969!
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 26,656
    Obelixx said:

    I still find it noteworthy that the pink and orange garden had a pink and orange attired gardener but maybe that struck me most because I had a very similar outfit - minus the bracelets - in 1969!
    Got any photos Obs?   ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,930
    No!  
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Red mapleRed maple Posts: 163
    Well, I thought both gardens were lovely in their own way. These ladies give a lot of time and love to their plots and it's obvious, too, that they derive a lot of pleasure and comfort from their gardens. Surely that is what we all aim for with our own gardens, and wouldnt it be dull if we all had the same? I become quite absorbed in mine, and it's true that being in a beautiful garden helps to calm the mind. My creation won't be to everyone's taste, why should it? But that doesn't matter. What does matter is that I derive a lot of pleasure from it as I'm sure you do from yours.
    What I think is nice about GW is that it offers ideas, especially for the novice, like me.  :)
  • Della84Della84 Posts: 11
    As a novice, I have only been watching GW for about a year so it doesn't seem repetitive to me yet as I'm learning a lot from it and it lead me to this forum.
    I was confused as to why it stopped over winter, I'm sure there were things to do and prepare for even if they gave us 15 minutes it would be better than nothing. 
    I really enjoyed it when Frances and the other chap were sharing an allotment. Then she started her own allotment and it was covered in weeds and I was looking forward to weekly installments on how she was tackling it but then they didn't come back to her for weeks.
    It seems a bit out of reach for me, all this panning across stately home gardens -  I'd rather see something realistic. 
  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,364
     To quote a very old radio program  "I think the answer I lies in the soil."
    There is something special about handling  your plants .

    I had a happy time yesterday dividing one Huechera Silver  scrolls into three and replanting by carefully washing off the soil and then replanting. Success. 

    I find that the time that the Beeb spends on the garden shows does not really give the help and advice and  technique that is so good for novices. 




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

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