slug proof veg

I know no veg is truly slug proof, but I was wondering what others with a serious slug problem can successfully grow in the ground. I'm growing a lot of things in containers this year which is more successful. Golden chard will be demolished in the ground, but in a pot I can find it quite safe with a slug snoozing next to it. 

Sweetcorn isn't touched (I'm doing baby corn this year as I don't have the space to grow in a big block) , oskar early dwarf peas were successful this year though the pea shoot plant i put out 2 nights ago has now gone. Onions - the slugs start to eat the stems after they keel over, so they are fine, and fordhook giant chard is generally successful if the plants go in quite big. The slugs eat some, but leave enough for us. (why do they grow so slowly!?). 

I'd love to hear ideas from others, as I have gaps  in the bed at the moment, and will have a gap next May to October. I'm open minded about ideas.

Posts

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,840
    Try slug nematodes in the Spring. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 298
    I used to have huge amounts of slugs and snails but night raids have helped hugely this year. Patience and diligence pay dividends...and of course nematodes as it has been suggested can help. 

    Growing your veg in 9cm pots until much stronger can also helps as they can resist attacks better and not be decimated.
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,496
    edited 13 August
    Growing your veg in 9cm pots until much stronger can also helps as they can resist attacks better and not be decimated.
    I have a lot of, er, wildlife in my garden. That has it's upsides, in that the birds and toads limit the slug population to some extent, but the downside is other birds and creatures (mice and voles, especially) do their own share of veg crop damage.

    As amancalledgeorge suggests, I grow most things in plugs and pot up to quite big plants before planting out.
    Brassicas will be in 1 litre pots before they go in the ground, by which time they are usually big enough to cope with peripheral nibbling. I net them against the butterflies. Apart from spring greens which suffer less because there are fewer slugs about through the winter, so I grow them on in pots until late - October - then plant them out without any extra protection. 
    Runner beans I start in root trainers and pot on to 4" pots (I have a few extra deep ones) before they go out.
    French beans seem to be less troubled by slugs (though preferred by the rabbits) so they stay in root trainers just until they are tall enough to start twining round a cane, to keep them off the ground. I also grow a bean called 'Greek Gigantes' which is like a runner bean but super vigorous so it usually goes faster than the slugs.
    I never plant broad beans or peas in the autumn. They don't ever live past Christmas so there's no point.
    Parsnips I can direct sow. Nothing seems to want to eat those.
    Carrots I grow a few in pots. Everything wants to eat those.
    Beetroot and chard do fine grown in plugs up to 9cm pots then out. The outer leaves get a bit ragged but the roots and the central leaves survive.
    Florence fennel doesn't seem to get eaten much.
    Salads are a waste of time apart from rocket and sorrel (both can be grown as perennials, which helps).
    I use nematodes on the potato bed and a four bed rotation, so every bed gets treated every 4 years. It's definitely reducing the local slug population.
    It's hard to love, there's so much to hate
    Hanging on to hope when there is no hope to speak of
  • bookmonsterbookmonster Posts: 305
    Maybe I need to try parsnips! I've never been organised about nematodes before. I find beetroot and chard are medium. Fordhook giant chard and albino beetroot I have grown for years but the sanguina and golden chard got gobbled up this year, I'm growing fordhook inside to go out when bigger and the golden is in pots. @raisingirl what got the broad beans, cold or slugs?
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,496
     @raisingirl what got the broad beans, cold or slugs?
    Not the cold, certainly. I think slugs were munching for a while, then they disappear when it gets properly cold, so if your only problem is slugs, they may be worth a try. Come the spring, they are up and growing away early so may be ahead of the slugs.

    In the depths of winter, mice dig the peas and beans up here - not much else to eat at that time, presumably
    It's hard to love, there's so much to hate
    Hanging on to hope when there is no hope to speak of
  • bookmonsterbookmonster Posts: 305
    Ha, we certainly have mice. I guess I don't have much to lose, I'll give them a go
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