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Escallonia issues

Hi all, after a bit of diagnosis please, I’ve got an Escallonia ‘pink elle’ it’s still a small plant because I only bought and planted it in the spring.
I’m in Yorkshire UK so having a very wet and rainy few days at the minute. 

I went out to check my garden tonight and noticed it looking like this, extremely bare. It was doing really well with plenty of leaves and flowering. Now the leaves are just dropping off so easily.

Any idea why it’s done this? From what I’ve read their main problem is leaf spot but I can’t see any of it.
Thanks

Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,543
    Maybe it's the scale of the photo, but I would not recommend planting such a small size Escallonia straight into the ground. Even though they are sold as seaside plants that can deal with wind, they are delicate shrubs when young, and best grown in a pot until they are more bulkier. Then they can be planted out.

    Prune out the top sections of the plant, your flowers will need deadheading for a possible second flush. Just looks like excess rain damage. Leaf drop on evergreen shrubs will happen when there is stress such as drought, excess moisture etc.

    I suspect your shrub had been grown in a very protected environment which can result in excess growth (lots of lush green leaves), but with very small root system. It is up to you, but I think it is better grown in a container for another year. That way, you can keep it in more free draining soil and care for it better by moving it where necessary. Also, they are not very hardy when they are young. So may need some protection at that size.
  • yorkshireroseyorkshirerose North YorkshirePosts: 574
    I agree with Borderline. Your plant does look very young.
    I planted the same variety, (because my Grand-daughter is called Elle) 2 years ago, it was well rooted in a 3litre pot at the time and is now a really healthy plant full of flowers in a sheltered, sunny position in well drained soil in North Yorkshire.

    Hope yours pulls through and looks happier after a bit of t.l.c. 
    A gardener's work is never at an end  - (John Evelyn 1620-1706)
  • Maybe it's the scale of the photo, but I would not recommend planting such a small size Escallonia straight into the ground. Even though they are sold as seaside plants that can deal with wind, they are delicate shrubs when young, and best grown in a pot until they are more bulkier. Then they can be planted out.

    Prune out the top sections of the plant, your flowers will need deadheading for a possible second flush. Just looks like excess rain damage. Leaf drop on evergreen shrubs will happen when there is stress such as drought, excess moisture etc.

    I suspect your shrub had been grown in a very protected environment which can result in excess growth (lots of lush green leaves), but with very small root system. It is up to you, but I think it is better grown in a container for another year. That way, you can keep it in more free draining soil and care for it better by moving it where necessary. Also, they are not very hardy when they are young. So may need some protection at that size.
    Thankyou for the lengthy reply, gave me good insight and very helpful tips! I’m going to go put it in a pot tonight and trim down the dead parts, yorkshirerose said:
    I agree with Borderline. Your plant does look very young.
    I planted the same variety, (because my Grand-daughter is called Elle) 2 years ago, it was well rooted in a 3litre pot at the time and is now a really healthy plant full of flowers in a sheltered, sunny position in well drained soil in North Yorkshire.

    Hope yours pulls through and looks happier after a bit of t.l.c. 
    Hi, that’s how mine was looking up until recently... it seemed to be doing really well up until no, either from the crazy heat and sun we’ve had or from the torrential rain we’ve had.


    P.s, are escallonia on the food list for and slugs or anything? Some of the leaves seem to have chunks taken from them
  • yorkshireroseyorkshirerose North YorkshirePosts: 574
    Could be damage by leaf-cutter bees.
    A gardener's work is never at an end  - (John Evelyn 1620-1706)
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