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Fungicide worries ...

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  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160
    People will go on believing what they want to believe until it's too late. At my age, not my problem. But I had kids, who have kids
  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 1,974
    I know it's happening with rose black spot. There are new strains more resistible to fungicides. The fungus also evolves to attack new disease-resistant varieties. You don't even need to use fungicides, the fungus is evolving anyway to survive in a changed situation.
    But it is a huge step from a stronger black spot fungus to human diseases.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160
    edhelka said:
    I know it's happening with rose black spot. There are new strains more resistible to fungicides. The fungus also evolves to attack new disease-resistant varieties. You don't even need to use fungicides, the fungus is evolving anyway to survive in a changed situation.
    But it is a huge step from a stronger black spot fungus to human diseases.
    But not such a huge step to fungicide resistance
  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 1,974
    There isn't one fungicide and one fungicide resistance. Diplocarpon rosae (rose blackspot fungus) becoming resistant to tebuconazole (one of the common agents in rose sprays) probably won't cause Trichophyton (fungus that can cause ringworm) to be more resistant to our immune system or to agents used in anti-fungal creams.
    But I don't have enough information to have an opinion on this. I am just saying that I would assume that fungi attacking plants are different fungi than those attacking people and that agents used against them are different agent than used in medicine. If not or if they are somehow closely related, then there could be some reasons for worries and it would be a good subject for research.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 71,973
    ...... I think it's highly unlikely that there is any connection between fungus and fungicides on plants and those that affect animals though.
    Not so I’m afraid 😢 

    Aspergillus is a common family of fungi that grow on decomposing plant material ... they are also responsible for a common ear infection ... which can spread to the brain if untreated. 

    https://www.gardenguides.com/132393-classification-aspergillus-niger.html


    https://www.aspergillus.org.uk/content/aspergillus-otomycosis


       @edhelka you’ll see from the above that the same or related fungi affect plants and animals ... it’s a recurring condition I’ve been treated for with steroids on quite a few occasions over the years. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 9,741
    As @Dovefromabove has already mentioned, Aspergillus is a fungi that commonly causes problems across the plant, animal and human world.
    A lot of yeasts [ which are fungi too ] also cause human infections, candidiasis.
    Southern trees bear a strange fruit
    Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 1,167
    ...... I think it's highly unlikely that there is any connection between fungus and fungicides on plants and those that affect animals though.
    Not so I’m afraid 😢 

    Aspergillus is a common family of fungi that grow on decomposing plant material ... they are also responsible for a common ear infection ... which can spread to the brain if untreated. 

    https://www.gardenguides.com/132393-classification-aspergillus-niger.html


    https://www.aspergillus.org.uk/content/aspergillus-otomycosis


    Ah, I stand corrected. My bad, as my children would say!
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 71,973
    edited July 2019
    This is way too specialised
    for me to understand more than a little of it  ... but I understand enough to know that the ramifications are likely to be serious. 
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1517838216305342

    When I was growing up on the farm back in the sixties veterinary science was already aware of bacteria developing resistance to antibiotics, but it took several decades for the problem to he taken seriously by the general public ... if indeed it has been even now ....

    Now concerns are being raised about fungicides ... how long will we have to wait before people see the writing on the wall .... ??? ☹️ 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 1,974
    @Dovefromabove Yes, I read that. But that doesn't change what I said. Resistances are often very specific, one type of fungus to one type of chemical. I am not someone who would worry based on a similar thought.

    BUT

    I am also not someone who would have an opinion without enough information, as I said in my previous post, I don't know enough. But I find the topic interesting so I googled some studies about this...
    There are several studies linking the use of Azoles in agriculture to the emergence of Aspergillus more dangerous to human. There are also some other studies about threats to human health from the general use of fungicides. It also looks like that it only takes years for the fungus to become resistant to a specific chemical. So even though there are more chemicals in use and more fungi, the process happens quite quickly.

    So yes, you are right. Maybe it should be said more often that using fungicides is not only dangerous to wildlife and beneficial fungi but also to us.
  • HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 631
    I personally have become convinced that humans’ well intentioned efforts to sort out problems and make “advances” will be responsible for the demise of the human race.  Either through messing up the planet, or because the human race ends up as immobile overweight blobs reliant on factory produced junk and robotic supplies from amazon. 

    It’s a stretch from spraying a pot plant to the demise of the planet, sure.  But as the saying goes, a journey starts with a single step. 

    Candida auris is not quite the same as thrush, which is Candida albicans, but article says that all Candida can be fatal....

    https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/candida-auris/candida-auris-qanda.html

    I am immune suppressed, and docs were concerned about the fungal infection on my toenail. Eventually decided to treat it with heavy duty fungicides as nothing else worked, but with weekly blood test to check my liver & kidneys were coping.  All that for a toe nail fungus! 
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