Tree suggestions

KT53KT53 Posts: 3,449
The current vegetable patch is about 30 feet by 20 feet but isn't getting used.  My thoughts are to plant a couple of trees,  and turn the area into a wild flower area.  I'm looking for suggestions for 2 trees which will give interest for most of the year.  Spring flowers, good foliage and some form of fruit for the birds in autumn and winter.
Stating 2 trees because I don't want anything which will grow massive and cast too much shadow over adjoining gardens.
In the garden we already have a crab apple, hawthorn and rowan (mountain ash). 

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 6,986
    Amelanchier is a must, imo.
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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 55,118
    punkdoc said:
    Amelanchier is a must, imo.
    I agree ... a multi stemmed Amelanchier lamarckii ... has ... beautiful blossom in the spring... ours is full of fruit just now and as it ripens the blackbirds are loving it ... then in the autumn it’ll glow with fiery orange and red before the leaves fall. 

    Theyre said not to like chalky but we’re on shallow  free draining 
    loam over chalk and ours seems very flappy and growing well

    Being multi-stemmed it provides lots of low cover for the smaller birds and they lurk in it while queueing up to feed on the seedheads from the centaurea and rudbeckia planted nearby. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,449
    Thanks for that.  Not something I was familiar with and sounds like something you would get an ointment from the chemist to treat.  Looks beautiful.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 55,118
    🙄 flippin’ auto correct! ‘Very flappy’ should read ‘very happy’ 😂 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ForTheBeesForTheBees Posts: 166
    Here's some wildlife friendly trees suggested by the RSPB.
    https://www.rspb.org.uk/get-involved/activities/give-nature-a-home-in-your-
    garden/garden-activities/grow-a-tree/


    How about some fruit trees on medium height stock? Birds such as Blackbirds, thrushes, fieldfare, will love you for unclaimed windfall. 
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,449
    🙄 flippin’ auto correct! ‘Very flappy’ should read ‘very happy’ 😂 
    I thought you just meant the branches move around a lot in the wind - seriously.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,449
    Here's some wildlife friendly trees suggested by the RSPB.
    https://www.rspb.org.uk/get-involved/activities/give-nature-a-home-in-your-
    garden/garden-activities/grow-a-tree/


    How about some fruit trees on medium height stock? Birds such as Blackbirds, thrushes, fieldfare, will love you for unclaimed windfall. 
    I'd rather steer away from fruit trees.  Part of the reason for giving up on the veg plot is that we simply don't get through enough of the produce ourselves.  It's all very well giving it away to friends and neighbours, but if I'm putting the work in I want the benefit. :D
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 2,262
    I love the shrubby Spindle Tree (Euonymus Alatus) for its weirdly textured, corky bark, amazing autumn colour and wonderful pink seed heads with their clusters of startling orange berries. The flowers are a bit insignificant, small and green, so wouldn’t put on the same spring floral show as an Amalanchier.  I have both wild, willowy versions of EA in my woodlands and a currently containerised tame one I will be planting out in the garden this autumn.

    Another small garden tree that has been on my fantasy wish-list for ages is a Luquidamber Styraciflua Gum Ball for its beautiful maple-like leaves, kaleidoscopic autumn colour and spiky fruit bobbles. Prohibitively expensive to get a decent-sized one tho, as its grafted onto dwarf root stock and a slow grower.
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