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Snake's head fritilliary

elliedaisyelliedaisy Posts: 31
Can I move snake's head fritillary now, they have died right back to the ground. They have flowered beautifully but are hidden away where they can't be seen. 

Posts

  • HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 601
    Probably ok, tho’ leaving a bit longer could be better.  But if that risks forgetting then do it now.  There’s a right time to do things in the garden and then there’s the time when one feels like doing that particular job and have the time and the tools to hand... I have the later approach to gardening!
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 1,764
    They also seed very freely so you can collect the ripe seed and just chuck it about where you want them.
  • elliedaisyelliedaisy Posts: 31
    Wow thank you 
  • cornellycornelly Posts: 819
    Since we stopped mowing the top end of our garden until late July, the fritillaries have spread through the seed dispersing and now give a fair bed of both white and purple/red, it is twice the bed now through the spring.
  • elliedaisyelliedaisy Posts: 31
    Thank you, they are lovely and not quite like anything else at that time of the year.
  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 336
    Whilst weeding the other day I inadvertently lifted some of my fritillary bulbs, so I rummaged around and lifted the lot and am now considering what's best to do with them. We get pheasants and they just peck the flowers off so I've been thinking I might put them in a pot somewhere the pesky birds can't get them. 

    So do I spread them out and keep them dry till autumn or will they be ok to go into a pot now? If in a pot then do I keep it moist or not yet? Also any thoughts on a nice small plant that would work in the same pot until the spring? This is Aberdeenshire....
  • That is a good question, I don't know the advice about moving bulbs. Hope someone knows the answer

  • i would get them in the ground (or pot) as soon as possible, they really don't like being dried out as they're technically a water meadow species so like being damp to wet
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