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Plant ID

DaveGreigDaveGreig West Fife, ScotlandPosts: 49
Can anyone please tell me the names of this plant and fern. The fern is in full sun in a fairly dry situation and is 20 years old.


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  • The fern is Polystichum setiferum, the Soft Shield Fern.

    The flowering plant is one of the wallflowers.
  • BijdezeeBijdezee BPosts: 1,484
    Fern looks a lot like mine. Polystichum setiferum. 
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 33,881
    Hello Dave. The flowers are wallflowers and the ferm looks like one of the Dryopteris group.
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • DaveGreigDaveGreig West Fife, ScotlandPosts: 49
    Thanks for that Ladybird, I think erisymum it is. I always thought wallflowers were biennial and discounted them because I’ve had this for 4 years. I was wrong.
  • RubytooRubytoo On the sofa, Southerly aspect.Posts: 1,287
    edited June 2019
    I wondered if the Erysimum (wall flower) might be Wenlock beauty.
    Oh second picture on the left about half way down you have a stripey snall too.
    :D

    Agree with Alan about the majority of the fern, It is Polystichum setiferum
    If you wish to propagate more you can do so by literally laying a frond down and weight it with a couple of stones or peg with wire to keep soil contact, it will sprout all over with new fronds and you can cut it into pieces to make more. Oops keep ti moist too.

    But at more of the bottom right side I think as Ladybird said there is a clump of (probably) Male fern.
    Sorry @Bijdezee I think yours is also what @Ladybird4 is identifiying?

    In winter the polystichum will stay wintergreen but the Dryopteris will die back.
    Hope you can see the difference  @DaveGrieg?

    Sorry I hope i have not confused the issue too much.
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 33,881
    @DaveGreig You are most welcome.
    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Rubytoo said:

    If you wish to propagate more you can do so by literally laying a frond down and weight it with a couple of stones or peg with wire to keep soil contact, it will sprout all over with new fronds and you can cut it into pieces to make more. Oops keep ti moist too.


    I will try that!
  • pitter-patterpitter-patter Posts: 1,820
     Can all the ferns be propagated like this?
  • RubytooRubytoo On the sofa, Southerly aspect.Posts: 1,287
    I don't think so pitter- pattter, not all but there may be oithers.

    The hen and chick one, Asplenium something? does have babies.
    I have never grown it, but seen it.

    The polystichums  are winter green and have hard stems and fronds, sorry not sure how to describe them compared to the deciduous types.
    There may be others but which ones I would not know.

    I have grown lots of different types from spores in the past, but I bought one or two different Polys and have always propagated them by .... I guess you would call it layering?
    The lower old fronds when damp and shaded though scruffy and brown will do it a bit on its own. But fixed down will produce a better result.

    It will be interesting to hear if there are others.
  • BijdezeeBijdezee BPosts: 1,484
    @Rubytoo.  - were you thinking my fern was a dryopteris?  It's definately a Polystichum, I have the plant label and yes it stays green over winter. 
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