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Coronet Apple Tree - Taste & Yield?

Hi,

I’ve been wanting to purchase a Coronet apple tree lately but wanted to do some more research into it before I buy, however I can’t seem to find any info on how they taste, which obviously is an important factor. Anyone care to share their experience with Coronet apple trees or recommend any other sweet/high yielding dwarf varieties? 

Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,988
    From what I can gather, though I may be wrong, “coronet apples” are not a variety of apple. Rather they are a style of growing an apple tree. I imagine that some grower has patented the name “coronet” and is selling the rights to other growers. 

    Varieties on offer seem to be James Grieve, Elstar and Cox. There may be others. 

    The main feature of a coronet apple tree would seem to be that it is a miniature tree. And it can grow in a pot. That is all.

    Any apple variety, more or less, that has been grafted onto a very dwarfing rootstock can produce a miniature tree that can grow in a pot. So choose a variety that you like and buy that variety on a very dwarfing rootstock.

    See M27 rootstock here

    https://www.orangepippintrees.co.uk/articles/fruit-tree-rootstock-tree-sizes


    One warning though. Apple trees in pots need to be treated with enormous care. A lot of watering, possibly twice a day in hot weather, a lot of feeding and a lot of making sure that the pot doesn't bake in the sun.






    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • pansyface said:
    From what I can gather, though I may be wrong, “coronet apples” are not a variety of apple. Rather they are a style of growing an apple tree. I imagine that some grower has patented the name “coronet” and is selling the rights to other growers. 

    Varieties on offer seem to be James Grieve, Elstar and Cox. There may be others. 

    The main feature of a coronet apple tree would seem to be that it is a miniature tree. And it can grow in a pot. That is all.

    Any apple variety, more or less, that has been grafted onto a very dwarfing rootstock can produce a miniature tree that can grow in a pot. So choose a variety that you like and buy that variety on a very dwarfing rootstock.

    See M27 rootstock here

    https://www.orangepippintrees.co.uk/articles/fruit-tree-rootstock-tree-sizes


    One warning though. Apple trees in pots need to be treated with enormous care. A lot of watering, possibly twice a day in hot weather, a lot of feeding and a lot of making sure that the pot doesn't bake in the sun.






    Thank you so much for this, I’m still a novice when it comes to gardening, so this is extremely helpful!
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,988
    edited June 2019
    Orange Pippin has supplied me with very good trees over the years. Other suppliers are available, of course.

    If you are going to buy a tree from Orange Pippin, or any other supplier, be sure to buy one that is on M27 rootstock. That will ensure that it doesn’t grow too big.  Plant it in a BIG pot - glazed ceramic will resist wind rock better than plastic and will retain more moisture than unglazed. A cylindrical shape is more stable than a tapered shape. Don’t buy one that tapers towards the top - if you ever want to get the tree out you will have to smash the pot.

    Plant it in John Innes Number Three compost. That is specially designed for plants that will spend their entire lives in a pot.

    Put a stake into the pot and buy a tree tie to attach it to the stake. That will prevent the tree from rocking about and getting damaged.

    In the growing season, but not in the dormant season, feed it with a regular liquid plant food about twice a month. 

    Good luck.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
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