Help needed - 2 different areas

Help/thoughts needed please. I’ve recently brought a house with a garden that comes with a number of challenges. At the top it has a landscaped area with a raised bed running the length of the house. That did have a number of rose bushes that I’ve now cleared. It then drops into a lawned area then another drop into a steep wooded area. It’s been an absolute mission clearing this as it’s been wild (primrose’s everywhere) but some lovely areas of ferns and some nice Japanese maples etc.

I was thinking perennials and ornamental grasses in raised bed at first however I would prefer to some way tie the two areas together via the planting in the raised area. My issue is this is dry and sunny as opposed to wet and shady. So my questions are: 
- Any ideas on planting in the raised area? Would the grasses look out of place? Would ideally like not much height in order to not obscure the view. 
- I need to replant in the steep slope area along side the maples, wet and shady, any ideas on planting here? 

Apologies for the poor photos but gives an idea
«1

Posts

  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 7
    edited 27 May


  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 1,338
    You could tie together the colours rather than the growing conditions, so for example choose some purple-foliage plants that like sun and good drainage to pick up the colour of the purple-leaved acer in the lower part.  Not all purple leaves though, that could look too heavy.
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,200
    What a splendoocious garden to acquire, lots of microclimates!  Grasses are an enormous and global family, so there must be something for every area.  When I visited California about 13 years ago, I was smitten with the red-flowered pennisetum which is often planted around pavement (sorry, sidewalk!) trees.  Not long after that, the catalogues began offering varieties that were hardy, or at least half-hardy, in the UK.  They would look great in the raised bed.

    As a nature lover, I would put native woodland plants among the trees, especially bluebells and wood anemones.  Not sure if they're native, but butcher's broom and Solomon's seal should do well there.
  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 7
    JennyJ said:
    You could tie together the colours rather than the growing conditions, so for example choose some purple-foliage plants that like sun and good drainage to pick up the colour of the purple-leaved acer in the lower part.  Not all purple leaves though, that could look too heavy.
    Thanks Jenny. Not thought of it that way. The perennials would probably work well for that. 
  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 7
    josusa47 said:
    What a splendoocious garden to acquire, lots of microclimates!  Grasses are an enormous and global family, so there must be something for every area.  When I visited California about 13 years ago, I was smitten with the red-flowered pennisetum which is often planted around pavement (sorry, sidewalk!) trees.  Not long after that, the catalogues began offering varieties that were hardy, or at least half-hardy, in the UK.  They would look great in the raised bed.

    As a nature lover, I would put native woodland plants among the trees, especially bluebells and wood anemones.  Not sure if they're native, but butcher's broom and Solomon's seal should do well there.
    Thank you :) Going to be a steep learning curve (excuse the pun) given my gardening experience is next to none! 
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 3,318
    One of the best grasses for hot and sunny spot is stipa gigantica, which is a dome shaped evergreen grass which throws up beautiful 5-6ft tall golden awns each year which shimmer and sway in the sunshine. It's a focal point see-through grass which won't obscure any view. Grows eventually to about 1 x 1 metre and the only maintenance is cutting off the dead awns/canes in the spring before the new shoots rocket through. I adore it.
  • Wrigs21Wrigs21 Posts: 7
    Thoughts on whether I’ve missed the boat to plant grasses, I know ideally spring or autumn 
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 3,318
    I wouldn't have thought it is too late now, it's only late May. You may need to keep it well watered for a few months, especially if it gets hot.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 6,910
    Now is an ideal time to plant grasses.
    Autumn is actually a bad time, as many grasses would just sulk, not putting on new roots and therefore succumb to winter damp.
    You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand
    The things you think are precious, i don't understand
  • KeenOnGreenKeenOnGreen Posts: 495
    We have a steeply terraced garden, and Lizzie27's suggestion of Stipa Gigantea is spot on.  Ours looks amazing when the light catches them.  Hakonechloa and Astelia would cope with both of those sites. Calamagrostis Karl Forster and Calamagrostis Brachytrycha, great grasses, but not as transparent as Stipa Gigantea.  How about something to pick up the colour of your red Acer, like Cotinus, Eucomis Sparkling Burgundy, or perhaps some red/purple Heucheras.  Steep terraces are a nightmare, but also thrilling because you can create real drama.  I'm both sympathetic and envious!
Sign In or Register to comment.