Forum home Problem solving

Yellow lawn after strimming

Hi there,

I'm very new to gardening as have recently bought my first house, so was hoping to plumb your depths of knowledge!

On my lawn there's this area of yellowed grass that I've uncovered after strimming up to the patio edge. Before strimming, the grass there had grown very luscious and long (maybe 6"). This photo is taken a week after strimming. Can you help me understand why it might be yellow, and if there's anything i can do to help? I believe it's had enough water as it's rained a fair bit and i've been watering other bits of the lawn where I've laid grass seed (which is growing nicely on bare patches).

I look forward to receiving your wisdom!
Many thanks,
Rob

Posts

  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,434
    When the grass has been long you will get yellow area when it's first cut.  It will recover.
  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 331
    i and i am sure millions of others have the same problem lol. I have the same problem with a big hedge I just trimmed too, bare and brown underneath.

    Anyway grass seems to grow faster around the borders and dies off lower down so when you end up cutting it, it will have all the dead undergrowth showing.

    The best solution to this is to mow regularly and keep all the grass even. Like KT says it will recover but if you don't mow it the same will happen again.

    I also find that you often get field grass growing amongst your lawn grass especially on borders. This stuff looks a bit like grass but it grows much faster and is thicker. I remove this as much as I can, literally take chunks out your lawn, reseed if necessary but the remaining grass will cover it again.




  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 331
    oh another thing i forgot to mention is that the lower you cut the more pronounced this problem will be. Cutting higher makes it harder for weeds and moss to establish itself too, you just have to mow a couple times more in a year..
  • robharbronrobharbron Posts: 13
    Thanks! 

    mrtjforman said:
    oh another thing i forgot to mention is that the lower you cut the more pronounced this problem will be. Cutting higher makes it harder for weeds and moss to establish itself too, you just have to mow a couple times more in a year..

    Could I just check my understanding... you're saying that leaving the grass longer ("cutting higher") will help to prevent weed and moss problems more than cutting the grass shorter?
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,597
    If your hedge is conifer trees, it's going to stay bare and brown.  Conifers don't regenerate form brown wood.

    As for grass, the green stuff is what is in the sun and doing the photosynthesis that feeds the plant.  If you cut all that off you are left with pale/yellow or brown stems at the base.   Give it a drink and some time and it will slowly green up again.  

    When you mow grass, keep the blades high so there's a larger leaf area to feed healthy roots.  Scalp it and you will have weak grass which succumbs easily to moss, weeds, drought and pests.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • robharbronrobharbron Posts: 13
    Obelixx said:
    When you mow grass, keep the blades high so there's a larger leaf area to feed healthy roots.  Scalp it and you will have weak grass which succumbs easily to moss, weeds, drought and pests.
    That's good to know! For some reason I thought shorter was better. I suppose I was imagining that would give me a lawn like a golf course fairway, but they must have something else going on there to keep it in shape!
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,597
    Different ground preparation with special soil mix, particular varieties of grass for rough, fairway and greens, oodles of staff and equipment...........
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
Sign In or Register to comment.