New to raspberries - dead or alive?

BhasBhas Posts: 16
Hi,
Bare with me... I'm new to this! I bought some bare root Tulameen canes in March and planted them up in large pots according to pack instructions and after looking at the RHS website.  I didn't cut them back as they were only about 10 inches high.  One of them has a single shoot (sorry if that's the wrong term) about three quarters of the way up the cane with a few leaves and buds.  Another one looks like it will get some new growth about a third of the way up, sprouting from a place that looks like it was pruned previously.  Other than that, absolutely nothing.  I've given them all a scratch and all but one is green under the bark.  The one that was brown and brittle I cut all the way back to the soil and was going to pull it up but when I felt around for the roots I found about an inch of stumpy growth from the bottom of the cane under the soil so I've left it in.  Can anyone tell me what's going on with them?  Everything I've seen about growing raspberries implies that I should be awash with shoots and leaves by now.
Thank you so much.     
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  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 13,561
    Raspberries prefer being in the ground to pots.  March is a bit late for bare root canes, they have probably been hanging around a bit too long.   You should have cut them down to a couple of inches above the soil, but leave them now. Keep watering and hope. New canes formed this year will give you fruit next year.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • BhasBhas Posts: 16
    Raspberries prefer being in the ground to pots.  March is a bit late for bare root canes, they have probably been hanging around a bit too long.   You should have cut them down to a couple of inches above the soil, but leave them now. Keep watering and hope. New canes formed this year will give you fruit next year.
    Thanks.  No space to put them in the ground unfortunately but bought this variety in good faith that they'd be suitable for pots.  I did wonder if March was a bit late.  Will just hope for the best for new growth then.
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 2,265
    Tulameen is a later summer fruiting raspberry, so is slower to get going than some. They have a different pruning regime to the autumn fruiting ones, the latter being the only ones where you chop the whole plant back to the ground after fruiting.

    With summer fruiting rasps, the fruit develops on canes that have developed the year before so you really don’t want to cut those back as you will lose all your fruit - these are the canes you are now seeing beginning to sprout.

    The dead brown one has fruited and gone last year and should have been chopped right down to the soil, but not pulled out as you will disturb the fragile roots of the plant and the new growth underground.

    I am sure Monty can explain it better than me, have a look at the ‘how to grow’ and ‘how to prune’ summer fruiting raspberries here:

    https://www.gardenersworld.com/search/?q=Summer+fruiting+raspberries+
  • BhasBhas Posts: 16
    Nollie said:
    Tulameen is a later summer fruiting raspberry, so is slower to get going than some. They have a different pruning regime to the autumn fruiting ones, the latter being the only ones where you chop the whole plant back to the ground after fruiting.

    With summer fruiting rasps, the fruit develops on canes that have developed the year before so you really don’t want to cut those back as you will lose all your fruit - these are the canes you are now seeing beginning to sprout.

    The dead brown one has fruited and gone last year and should have been chopped right down to the soil, but not pulled out as you will disturb the fragile roots of the plant and the new growth underground.

    I am sure Monty can explain it better than me, have a look at the ‘how to grow’ and ‘how to prune’ summer fruiting raspberries here:

    https://www.gardenersworld.com/search/?q=Summer+fruiting+raspberries+
    Thank you Nollie. I'll have another look at Monty's sage advice.  I didn't realise Tulameen was late-fruiting so I guess I just need to be patient and see what sprouts.  It's my first year growing anything at all and it's a steep learning curve!  Not helped when I don't know what I'm looking for and have read so many stories of canes just staying sticks in the ground. 
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 2,265
    Its easier than it sounds, honest! But don't expect too much of them the first year (this would be true if they were in the ground as well). Just keep an eye on any canes that do fruit, however pathetically (tie a bit of string round as a reminder) so you know to cut those ones down but not any new green canes.
  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 197
    all this advice about pruning, to me pruning needs to be done once your garden explodes and plants will take over like a jungle if you don't, otherwise no pruning needed.

    Also I'm tending to find newer modern varieties don't even need much pruning compared to older varieties that need pruning to form proper fruits. 

    Anyway back to the plants, the bigger the plant you get and from a good company the better the plants will do even producing a crop the first year.

    Then if you want to save a couple quid you get plants half the size that will produce fruit a few years later.

    Then if you want to save a couple more quid you go for the bare root option and hope your plant survives.

    If it is from the poundshop or in that price range then the symptoms you are describing are perfectly normal, the one with a bit of growth this year will act the way you are expecting it to by next year, the dried up one sounds dead but you might as well give it a chance, then check back on them in a years time.
  • BhasBhas Posts: 16
    all this advice about pruning, to me pruning needs to be done once your garden explodes and plants will take over like a jungle if you don't, otherwise no pruning needed.

    Also I'm tending to find newer modern varieties don't even need much pruning compared to older varieties that need pruning to form proper fruits. 

    Anyway back to the plants, the bigger the plant you get and from a good company the better the plants will do even producing a crop the first year.

    Then if you want to save a couple quid you get plants half the size that will produce fruit a few years later.

    Then if you want to save a couple more quid you go for the bare root option and hope your plant survives.

    If it is from the poundshop or in that price range then the symptoms you are describing are perfectly normal, the one with a bit of growth this year will act the way you are expecting it to by next year, the dried up one sounds dead but you might as well give it a chance, then check back on them in a years time.
    Thank you!  Seems I just need to wait, keep them comfy and see what happens next year.  There were from a reputable garden centre so was hoping they'd be a bit more predictable but I guess half the fun of gardening is watching what happens!  TLC for the canes and more learning for me now.   
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 2,265
     I'm tending to find newer modern varieties don't even need much pruning compared to older varieties that need pruning to form proper fruits. 
    Out of interest, which newer modern summer fruiting varieties that don’t need much pruning are we talking about? Surely you still cut down the fruited canes, like older varieties, or you end up with a tangled mess? I’m not being facetious, I’m genuinely interested in your experience.
  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 197
    I have some varieties that need pruning otherwise my berries come out too small and sparse, no idea what name that are, with pruning they do much better.

    Ojebyn is a really tasty variety that I have not pruned in 5 years but it is a bit of a tricky variety imo, doesn't grow very tall either.

    Jonkher von Tets doesn't need pruning. 

    I don't prune my raspberries. You know how they say cut down all shoots end of the year? I only do that if the canes get too tall, otherwise they fruit again the next year. 

    Maybe I am missing out, who knows I have obviously pruned less rather than more.. I'm happy for now. Like said I found out the hard way that some of mine do need pruning, one bush refused to fruit entirely, then I pruned it and what a difference.
  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 197
    Oh sry this is about raspberries mainly it seems. Maybe I've been doing it wrong, concensus does seem to cut them down completely.
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