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Bay Leaf fragrance.

AchtungAchtung Poole, Dorset. Posts: 159
I was given a piece (whole branch) of a Bay tree last year. It came from a plant which was more than 10 feet tall, very mature. It had some leaves on it at the time, 3 inches long, and with no scent whatsover. Do Bay Leaves, to be used for cooking, need to be very young? Perhaps I don't have a "cooking" Bay Tree but some other specimen. 

Posts

  • B3B3 Posts: 21,451
    I  think there are different kinds. Does it smell when you brush against it? Cooking ones do.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 631
    If the leaves are dry they don’t smell.  But if you crush them then they should smell?   If they don’t them must be some other type of laurel..there are quite a few.   Age doesn’t matter.
  • B3B3 Posts: 21,451
    Is it alive?
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • AchtungAchtung Poole, Dorset. Posts: 159
    B3 said:
    Is it alive?
    Yup. Very much so, sprouting all over now but I don't want a 10 ft high plant full of leaves that I can't cook with. 
  • AchtungAchtung Poole, Dorset. Posts: 159
    If it is a Bay ( edible variety ), it will only smell when you pick and crush/break the leaf.  You can use fresh green leaves or you can pick a bunch and dry them for future use.  
    I use both methods and can't honestly tell the difference.
    Ah, so there are inedible varieties? I think that's what I'm growing.
  • CeresCeres Posts: 2,126
    Better safe than sorry. You don't want to poison yourself. You would probably be better off buying a small bay tree and growing it in a pot near the house.
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