The Cuttings Thread

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  • just found this video actually....

    is this what I should do?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qTwvH2nccs

    and also I'm not sure when I should be doing the cuttings with my plant as I'm not sure which variety it is  :dizzy:
  • HexagonHexagon Posts: 1,014
    I’m thinking....FAIL

    Brown and crispy. Sigh. Maybe cuttings aren’t for me. Well draining soil, watered regularly. A few were ripped out by (I presume) animals. I could probably save 3 of them at most
    but I have no idea if they’ll have formed roots or if they’ll rip off when I pull them out to check.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,475
    edited May 2019
    Don’t expect cuttings to maintain the green leaves they start out with. They often/usually lose them. They have no roots yet with which to take up water ... you’re waiting for them to form. 

    I usually wait several weeks before giving up on softwood cuttings; months for heeled and hardwood cuttings. 

    Afraid your impatience is doing you no favours 😞 😉 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,902
    I'd have out three or four of those round the edge of a 5 or 6 inch plastic pot, rather than in a big trough. Too much scope for drowning in there.
    Fill pots to the top with gritty compost, treat as before in terms of trimming leaves etc,  and keep them somewhere sheltered, and don't overwater.
    Then wait.
    They'll tell you when they've rooted. It'll be a while, and it's when there's some new growth showing, and the cuttings don't easily pull up. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,245
    As fairy says, they’re best in a pot, take long shoots, push right down, cut the leaves, water, then out put a lemonade bottle or a plastic bag over for a couple of weeks. Keep them inside a greenhouse or conservatory and any they’ll go, Best done late summer. 

    All of ours have been grown from cuttings, all 60 odd of them! 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,120
    I've had success with weigela cuttings, did the same as Fairy and Lyn advised above. Put four around the edges of a small plastic pot, covered with a plastic bag, and waited. 
  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 399
    I’m thinking....FAIL

    Brown and crispy. Sigh. Maybe cuttings aren’t for me. Well draining soil, watered regularly. A few were ripped out by (I presume) animals. I could probably save 3 of them at most
    but I have no idea if they’ll have formed roots or if they’ll rip off when I pull them out to check.
    Did you have them covered?  You need to keep moisture and humidity locked in.  Were they in direct sunlight?

    i’m a complete novice at this too.  Just taken cuttings from buddleia (globosa and davidii), spirea, azalea luteum, weigela and choisya over last couple of days.  

    All are now sealed up in little plastic bag tents!  Hope some strike.  

    Choisya was a learning curve.  The cuttings were all floppy and I’ve since read up and found that Choisya are best from semi ripe cuttings






  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 399

  • HexagonHexagon Posts: 1,014
    No, I didn’t put a plastic bag over it, it’s just been left outside. It’s been raining so I’ll stick a plastic bag over now. I’ve been keeping it watered when it direct sunlight. 

    I’m going to try some softwood buddleia cuttings this week, will put 3 or 4
    around a 1L pot.
  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 399
    No, I didn’t put a plastic bag over it, it’s just been left outside. It’s been raining so I’ll stick a plastic bag over now. I’ve been keeping it watered when it direct sunlight. 

    I’m going to try some softwood buddleia cuttings this week, will put 3 or 4
    around a 1L pot.
    I would think that’s your problem
    then @ImpatientGardener

    The cuttings have no roots and so they are not able to take up water effectively.  Keeping them
    covered traps in the moisture and so they the leaves are at less risk of drying out completely.

    Also the recommendation is to keep cuttings somewhere bright but out of direct sunlight. Personally I have always found that a bit confusing but any direct sunlight is going to crisp up those leaves in no time.
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