Ash sapling?

loliloli Posts: 52
before I dig this out as it’s fairly hard to pull up. Is this an unwanted ash sapling (no tree nearby but I know the seeds travel far). Just want to confirm it before. Also in the photo is a very out of season cyclamen 😂
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  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 13,365
    edited 15 May
    Yes, Pull it out with as much root as you can. You may need to water it well first to loosen it.
    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • loliloli Posts: 52
    Thanks it’s in quite a damp area so hoping a bit of brute force does the trick. 
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,011
    Yes - I think I got rid of at least 10 today ( and still more to do ).  They are rapid growers and will continue to germinate all summer 
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 1,671
    They are a total pest in a year I have enough to create a forest.
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 1,314
    edited 15 May
    Sadly nearly all mature Fraxinus excelsior...common ash trees are now completely dead round here.
    Soon, no one will be worrying about a plague of seedling/baby trees.

    First Elms now Ash...oh dear.
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 7,735
    Sadly nearly all mature Fraxinus excelsior...common ash trees are now completely dead round here.
    Soon, no one will be worrying about a plague of seedling/baby trees.

    First Elms now Ash...oh dear.
    Due to the enormous number of ash seedlings produced, I'm sure a resistant strain would appear if left to nature, but who is going to let a forest of ash trees grow on their land?  Well, apart from forestry plantation owners of course.  Now if they'd have grown-on the naturally produced seedlings themselves instead of buying them in from overseas (I was incredulous when I found that out - importing ash saplings?!), we wouldn't have this problem. ;)
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,011
    Sadly nearly all mature Fraxinus excelsior...common ash trees are now completely dead round here.
    Soon, no one will be worrying about a plague of seedling/baby trees.

    First Elms now Ash...oh dear.
    I can understand your point in general but I'm lucky enough to have a mature Ash here which has taken me several months to obtain permission to prune ( Conservation Area ) and saplings are literally growing everywhere in both front and back garden.  Most have been allowed to grow on and some presumably have been chopped but not removed.  So a veritable forest here just where they are not needed - i.e. a relatively small garden and growing everywhere including against the house walls.  There is a limit.
    Anyone wanting some seedlings would be more than welcome :)

    Bob also makes a good argument - importing Ash seedlings ?  Beats me.
  • HexagonHexagon Posts: 533
    Is this an ash then? Crowding out a miniature rose so the roots may be disturbed if I’m trying to remove a bloody tree.

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 7,735
    Yes.  If you can't dig them out, cut to the ground and paint the surface with full strength (as advised on the container) SBK brushwood killer.  Cover it if you're worried about anything/one coming into contact for a week.  You may have to repeat but I never have had to.  Works great for those which are discovered in really awkward places like the junction of paving and a wall.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • HexagonHexagon Posts: 533
    Funny you should say that, there is also another stump very near the wall of the house. When I first saw it I thought it was a stupid place to plant a tree, but now I know what it is, wow, those ash seedlings really do get everywhere! I have no idea where the nearest ash tree is.
    Shame, I really like the young foliage.
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