Pittosporum - spots on leaves. Advice on Salvia, Bellis, Fr. Marigold and Cordyline.

Hi everyone, I'm new to gardening and I'm getting lost reading all the different publishings online so I thought a forum would be a good way for me to ask my questions for advice.   

I have couple of questions that I need some help with, if anyone can offer any advice that would be lovely. 

I was given two Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Queen', they were in a bad way and the leaves have red spots on them. I released some of the stems, put them in larger containers, compost and some feed. They are well watered but not over watered and draining well. Please see pictures attached. Is this a rot and if so, how do I go about saving it. Fungicides? Pruning? Any advice would be great as I would love to save them. 

My other questions really show off my novice status but these conversations will aid me in learning thoroughly and putting it into practice. 

I have planted some Salvia Red and Bellis variety but the leaves are starting to go yellow (especially the Salvia Red) and the Bellis leaves look a little destroyed. I worked the soil, added compost, feed and grit (however the soil does have a fair amount of stones in it). They were well watered and the soil is currently moist down to second knuckle of finger. We've had good sun which the bed sees around 2pm onwards. I don't think they've been over/under watered. Any advice. 

Advice on watering French marigolds. 

Finally, the Cordyline Red star. I have planted this in a larger container. Compost, good water drainage and a little feed. The lower leaves are wilting a little but the others are standing erect and the tips of the leaves are starting to brown a little. Again I don't believe I have over/under watered it as the soil is moist but not soggy. Many pictures I have seen seem to resemble this but I want to do right by it, learn now and carry that knowledge forward. 

Thank you all so much for your time in helping this novice gardener learn. 

Best, Andrew. .

Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,007
    I'm afraid the leaf spots on Pittosporums are quite common. You should try to tolerate it. Once your shrub has matured a bit more, you can prune them out. Always water from the base and never water from above. Grow your shrub in free draining soil. They don't like heavy damp soils. 

    Not sure about french marigolds & Cordyline, but do post some photos of the Salvia and Bellis so it's more helpful for others to know which types you mean.
  • Andrew.D.PAndrew.D.P Posts: 7
    Thank you @Borderline that's very helpful! I will mix in some more grit with the compost, I feel I have been too tame with it. Would you say no to fungicides? I've no experience with them. 

    I will post some photos of the Salvia Red, Bellis, Fr. Marogilds and Cordyline tomorrow? 

    Thank you, Andrew. 


  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,007
    I would not waste time and money on such products. They do not work and most of these issues will not go away until you get to know what certain plants like and dislike.

    Unfortunately, Pittosporums, especially the variegated ones are prone to these leaf spots and they get more affected in areas with high rain fall in humid conditions, and shrubs planted densely with minimal air circulation. Keep it in an open area away from too many other over-hanging shrubs crowding it. Lay a fresh layer of compost every year and promptly remove any dead leaves lying under the shrub, that should help your shrub more.
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,011
    Cordyline Red Star is not quite so vigorous as the basic but even so, it will eventually suffer in a container.
    The leaf tips will brown due to sun scorch, frost or cold winds.  The lower leaves will also die back and these can be removed without any problem. It's a natural process.  Provided the heart of the plant looks healthy, you shouldn't need to worry but you may want to think about planting it in the ground eventually.
    You don't say when you planted the Cordyline or whether it is a recent purchase - many GC's sell these plants which have been reared in optimum ( or false ) conditions and will therefore suffer from a bit of a shock if you buy and then pop them straight into your garden.
  • Andrew.D.PAndrew.D.P Posts: 7
    edited 16 May
    Thank you for the advice @Borderline , I'll definitely be moving forward with that!

    @philippa smith2 smith2 Thank you for the information regarding the Red star. I do plan on planting it in the ground, just finding the right place for it! 
    It was a GC purchase, as are most of the plants and shrubs I have bought (although an independent nursery has opened up nearby so I will be heading there for a look). I think all of them are suffering from a little shock, temperature wise etc. Hopefully it'll settle. Sun scorch has played a huge part over the last few days. I have had the time to plant due to having some time off work, however it just so happened to be very hot weather. I'm trying to water well at the base so the roots get a good drink as apposed to a sprinkling of water all over. I'm adding Fish, Bone and Blood also for some slow release nutrients.
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,011
    Sounds like you are on the right track Andrew - best of luck with all your new plants :)
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