Forum home Fruit & veg

Berry bushes in Pots...size?

Hello all,

I was hoping for some advice and general feedback about planting fruit bushes (blackberries, raspberries and the moment) in pots.

Is it the bigger the better (pot size that is) when it comes to producing fruit or is there more to it then that? And I will be growing more than just the rasps and blackberries so any other input would be truly grateful (as would pictures of peoples fruit in pots)  

I've seen videos on the internet about all fruits growing in small pots but I think that comes down to the person being more of an artist trying to create a "feature" more than the fruit itself.

thanks in advance.

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,611
    I think you'll be OK with currants in pots - red, black, white - plus gooseberries and blueberries as these are shrubs with roots that stay put - and can be kept healthy with decent compost, regular feeding and appropriate watering.

    Blackberries and raspberries are cane fruit and like to spread themselves and do better in the ground.  Raspberries in particular like to send up new shoots form their roots and spread themselves about whilst blackberries are very vigorous and need a lot of root space.   Have a look at this advice from the RHS - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/fruit/blackberries
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • ForTheBeesForTheBees Posts: 168
    I've just brought some Groovy raspberry (Rubus Groovy, 'Jdeboer005') which are  a small variety sold as suitable for container growing (10L for one or 40L for three). Hopefully I can keep them happy for a few years...
  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 331

    Groovy sounds like a bit of an experimental variety. It mentions yellow leaves and small height, doesn't say much about the yield.
    One thing I have learnt over time, some varieties might look or taste great but if they don't do well in our climate or get attacked by bugs every year or grow slowly then they are not worth it. Better to find a variety that is a known good producer. It might be good but it takes  2 years for these plants to produce fruit and it's a long time to experiment with as a small gardener. I'm not saying groovy is no good, I am saying it is such a new variety we won't know for the next 5 years whether it will be any good or not. Most of my "best" tasting varieties get ravaged by bugs every year and the yield is terrible compared to "great" or "average" tasting. 

    I grew autumn bliss in a pot and in the soil. It is the best known dwarf variety and it did just as good in the pot as in the soil. I can highly recommend that variety for pots and it is quite common in garden centers and shops.





  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 331
    pot size is important but not as important as the right soil. I am sure there is better but i use the wilko john innes soil with decent results.

    this ben connan is fruiting in a very small pot, the bigger it gets the bigger the pot it will need although I won't be keeping it in a pot forever.


    This raspberry allgold is doing great in a pot, producing 2 new canes this year and by next should be producing more still. I think it's 2 years old. I'm planning to keep it in a pot as it doesn't grow very tall

  • Ah brilliant! I've actually just stuck an All Gold into the ground. I would love to see a picture of yours fruiting!

    And yes I bet soil and feeds are the crux of getting the best results.
    Is seaweed feed good for fruits in pots? Only ask because I see Monty feed a tonne of stuff with seaweed.
  • mrtjformanmrtjforman Posts: 331
    seaweed feed is ok but overmarketed. I look at seaweed extract like the goji berries of the fertilizer world, overpriced for what it does.

    Plants mainly need macro nutrients so a balanced cheap tomato food is usually best, if they show signs of micro nutrient deficiency then the seaweed extract can help.

    I would look at it as a last resort and tbh have never used it after trying it 20 years ago...

    I mainly use Fish,blood and bone meal to fertilize my soil.

    I also personally rate worm castings far higher than seaweed extract but thats just me.
  • ForTheBeesForTheBees Posts: 168
    edited May 2019

    Groovy sounds like a bit of an experimental variety. It mentions yellow leaves and small height, doesn't say much about the yield.
    One thing I have learnt over time, some varieties might look or taste great but if they don't do well in our climate or get attacked by bugs every year or grow slowly then they are not worth it. Better to find a variety that is a known good producer. It might be good but it takes  2 years for these plants to produce fruit and it's a long time to experiment with as a small gardener. I'm not saying groovy is no good, I am saying it is such a new variety we won't know for the next 5 years whether it will be any good or not. Most of my "best" tasting varieties get ravaged by bugs every year and the yield is terrible compared to "great" or "average" tasting. 

    I grew autumn bliss in a pot and in the soil. It is the best known dwarf variety and it did just as good in the pot as in the soil. I can highly recommend that variety for pots and it is quite common in garden centers and shops.
    Well, as I'd already bought them a few weeks ago I'll see how they do and report back on their productivity.  As I'm only growing them for a bit of fun, if I decide to replace them in a few years then so be it.  To be honest, most of the advice seems to be that raspberries only do well in pots for a few years so I was expecting to have to refresh them periodically anyway.
Sign In or Register to comment.