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Weeds and a grass to ID please

Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453
Hello
I'm battling with a very tenacious weed in a big border. It's one of those that spreads by long yellow roots, all attached to each other in a string of rosettes - see pic below


The first question is what is this weed please? The next question is do I have to remove every last little section of root, even the thinner threads, or should removing most of it stop it reappearing? 

In the same border there were a few of these plants...



I assumed they were the same weeds, just left to get big and flower, but now I'm not so sure. Can anyone help on that point please?

Finally I have found a few little clumps of a different type of grass within all the weeds. There's one in the middle of the weeds in the first pic, and here's one I cleared earlier



Is this going to be an ornamental grass or something I will wish I had dug out in the first place? The leaves are pretty strong and the roots don't seem to be that deep or spreading - I know this from digging out a couple in the wrong place already.

All thoughts welcome as ever, thanks 

Posts

  • LoxleyLoxley Posts: 4,453
    Can't make out what your weed is. Second pic is Red Campion, which I'd keep as I love the flowers (it's easy to pull up unwanted clumps if you have to). The third is probably Common Rush, Juncus effusus. It's a native but I don't think it's very ornamental so other than around a wildlife pond I'd pull it up.
  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453
    Here are some more pics of the weed if that helps

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,902
    I don’t know what that weed is called, but it doesn’t grow into the one with the pink flowers, the Campion.  I wouldn’t let it self seed, everyone of those pink flowers makes thousands of very fine seeds.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,440
    I think your weed is sheep's sorrel, Rumex acetosella.  As you've found, it grows fom every bit of root you leave in the soil... the only good thing about it is that it's edible.   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • AsarumAsarum East AngliaPosts: 567
    I agree with sorrel and campion. The ‘grass’ looks as though it’s a rush.  Sedges have edges, rushes are round and grasses have knees that bend to the ground. 
    East Anglia
  • guttiesgutties N. IrelandPosts: 224
    yep, the last one one is definitely the soft rush.  It's indicative of damp soil; I know as my "garden" is full of them.

    @Lyn, is it the Red Campion that unleashes thousands of seeds?  I have them flowering in my garden (sowed seed last year) for the first time.
  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453
    Hmmm, a quick Google does indeed confirm sheep's sorrel, especially the bit that says it thrives in dry, sandy, acidic soil, which is exactly what's in the bed where it is.  Also confirms my fear that I need to remove all traces of root, which is a right pain in the posterior! 

    Not sure if I would bother to eat it, might have a little taste tomorrow when getting rid of it, but to be honest I'd just prefer it not to be there at all.  Happily I can't ever recall seeing it flower, since apparently that just means prolific numbers of seeds, so presumably I've managed previously to just about keep on top of it, or at least what shows on the surface anyway.

    The bed is large and looks pretty clear where I've gone over it, but the next big problem is the expanse of open ground I've just provided for all the other lovely weed seeds doubtless lurking just beneath the surface.  I might be asking for design ideas over in the design forum.....

    Oh, and I also discovered the bed is home to a burrowing bee, pretty thing with a bright reddy/orange middle, so off to Google that too.  I'm sure the bees and I can live in harmony, unlike the flippin' sorrel! 

    Thanks for all the replies, font of all knowledge as ever :smile:
  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453
    Asarum said:
    I agree with sorrel and campion. The ‘grass’ looks as though it’s a rush.  Sedges have edges, rushes are round and grasses have knees that bend to the ground. 
    I love this! Will endeavour to remember it next time I'm looking at grasses! 
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