Trellis conundrum

amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 338
Hi all,

I've been scratching my head for weeks trying to figure out a way to fix a trellis to our aluminium colourfence fence. Colourfence make these seamless aluminium permanently painted fences and we love ours, but make it very difficult to have a climbing rose on it.

Have considered colour matching trellis panels, but think it will look clunky.

Have considered having metal frames made with galvanized wires put in to help the rose climb.

Considered having PVC coated garden fencing mesh used...but the fixing would be tricky as I'd rather not make any holes in the structure as it would compromise it.

Do any of you clever people have any suggestions? All ideas gratefully accepted. 

Here are a few pictures to give you an idea 

Here's the website of them to give you an even clearer idea: https://colourfence.co.uk/ 






To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow

Posts

  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 2,181
    What a smart looking fence! I think I would knock in some independent, sturdy posts and stretch tensioned wired between them, a couple of inches away from the fence, and train your rose along those. That way, you are not drilling into or compromising your fence in any way. The posts could be metal (sunk into and concreted into the ground) and painted to match the fence so they visually disappear.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 54,607
    I’d be worried about the metal heating up and scorching nearby plants ... my garage door gets incredibly hot after just a little sunshine. 🤔 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 2,181
    Thats true, Dove. That was part of my thinking of an independent structure away from the metal so the plants weren’t coming into contact with it, but the reflected heat might be too much. And maybe more than a couple of inches in any case...
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 54,607
    I think it could be a problem for some plants ... on the other hand standing pots of Toms and chillis in front of them to ripen in the reflected warmth could work 🤔 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 2,895
    Who knew that such a thing existed, could I be cheeky and ask how much it is per section, amd guessing very expensive, e have quarter of an acre, dont think you would want to edge that!  agree with everyone, especially with your london microclimate, its going to get VERY hot.
  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 338
    Thanks everyone for the suggestions...we will probably go for the metal idea... thankfully that side of the fence is in the shade of a nearby garage so it doesn't warm up. The side fence is a bit more exposed to the sun since our neighbours don't grow anything in their garden, but no plants were harmed last year. Will keep an eye on a couple of culinary laurels I have in a couple of pots near it...but should be OK. Aluminium dissipates heat very quickly which helps not keep warm for long. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 338
    Hi @Nanny Beach it was just under £120 per metre including the removal of the old fence, installation, 25 year warranty and a gate. So definitely not cheap but it's very adaptable as they are not panels, it's more of a kit that can be deployed within the fixed framework. If you think how many times you'd have to paint a wooden dance in two decades, I think it's good value. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
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