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Small tree/shrub for lawn

Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
Half tempted to put something where the slabs are in the middle of the lawn-



Daft idea? Waste of time? It's either that or just turn it into grass as the slabs serve no purpose.
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  • DampGardenManDampGardenMan Posts: 1,054
    It all depends on what your tastes are! Putting a tree/shrub where the slabs are would look very symmetrical to my eye, and I don't like that. I'd enlarge the side border (and add another adjacent to the ?gravel path, perhaps making the path a bit more curved at the same time) and then put large shrubs/small trees in those. But it all depends on your preferences, free time and pocket!
  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    Yeah I've got no inclination to change the border there.
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,339
    I would have had something planted there long ago... what was the slab used for? presumably there is soil underneath?  if so, I'd put a vigorous apple tree on the lawn on MM106 rootstock.. with perhaps a dwarf one somewhere in the border for pollination purposes..   something like that... otherwise an ornamental tree of your choice..
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,079
    It might be the angle of the photo but I think a tree or shrub would look odd there because it's not exactly central. It could look like it was meant to be in the centre but was a bit off. To my mind if a garden is going for a symmetrical formal look then it has to be precise. Another thing is that you'd have to clear a bigger area to plant a tree or big shrub. They don't like competition from grass growing too close, and grass won't really thrive in the shade from a tree/shrub.
  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    I moved into the house in 2012 so who knows how many years it's been like that.
  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    JennyJ said:
    It might be the angle of the photo but I think a tree or shrub would look odd there because it's not exactly central. It could look like it was meant to be in the centre but was a bit off. To my mind if a garden is going for a symmetrical formal look then it has to be precise. Another thing is that you'd have to clear a bigger area to plant a tree or big shrub. They don't like competition from grass growing too close, and grass won't really thrive in the shade from a tree/shrub.
    The slabs are central...
  • edhelkaedhelka GwyneddPosts: 2,112
    You have a nice lawn but that slab would drive me crazy, it would go the first day I would be in the house :) Is there a soil under it or does it hide something (drainage, manhole cover etc.)? I don't like it as a planting space, I would do it as grass and if you want a space for more plants (I would want that), there are better parts of your garden for that.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 6,079
    Ah OK. It looks like they're more to the right in the picture.
  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    edhelka said:
    You have a nice lawn but that slab would drive me crazy, it would go the first day I would be in the house :) Is there a soil under it or does it hide something (drainage, manhole cover etc.)? I don't like it as a planting space, I would do it as grass and if you want a space for more plants (I would want that), there are better parts of your garden for that.
    Wouldn't have thought they're hiding anything.
  • Garden noobGarden noob Posts: 260
    Have you considered a small tree in a pot on that spot? E.g. a magnolia? That should help avoid competition issues between the tree and the grass, so presumably the grass will stay healthier. It would also mean you can leave the slabs if you want.

    Personally I would steer clear of fruit trees. I hate fruit falling on a lawn - it's a pain IMHO.

    Here's a starting point https://www.thespruce.com/potted-magnolia-care-2132830
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