Easiest Plants to grow

Hi Guys,

I'm all for being relaxed in my garden borders, and don't have any specific design criteria that I stick to. I'm also all for minimal maintenance.

Thought I'd ask what you guys think are the easiest plants to grow in a no fuss garden border. Either perennials, self seeding annuals, or even evergreens & shrubs. 

I've had some success with hardy Geraniums, Calendula, and Rudbeckia, along with a few others, but I find that it is very trial and error in what works and survives in my border.

What do you find are easy dependable plants. and what do you have success with.

G.

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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,051
    It depends on soil, aspect and climate.  What will be easy in Devon may well fail completely in Aberdeen.   What may do well in the wetter west of the country would dry to a crisp in parts of Essex.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,198
    I like plants that readily self-seed. Borage, nastursium, foxglove, teasel, jacobs ladder and calendula are all good dooers for me. Basically posh weeds :#
  • GlenjjonesGlenjjones Posts: 57

    Fair point Obelixx.

    I'm not looking for any specific suggestions for my garden, I'm just interested to hear what others like and have success with in their own gardens. I realise it may not work in another area.

    Just a general discussion really.

  • Daylilies grow well in any soil, and are happy in wet soil but also cope well with drought. The only problem is that the early flowering varieties are prone to daylily midges, which spoil the flowers, so go for mid to late season varieties.
  • GlenjjonesGlenjjones Posts: 57

    Wild Edges, I like the way you term them posh weeds. I am a firm believer that a weed is just a plant in an unwanted place. was thinking about adding some foxgloves.

    Alan, I actually have a small daylily plant that was taken from a cutting about 12 years ago, and then grew really well at our old house, so when we moved I took a small cutting with me and now 4 years later it is finally getting a little larger and promising flowers this year. I have always liked them and after you reminding me, may look for some other colours/varieties to add to the border. I love how the flowers only last 1 day but the plant seems to flower for ages.

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 3,358
    I like Penstemons, very easy to grow in this garden (south-facing clay on a slope). Hardy geraniums, likewise. Sibirica and bearded Irises, Parahebe and very dwarf dark holly, Caryopteris, Potentillas, Hellebores, Euronymus (various). Most of these don't need much attention.  
  • WillDBWillDB Posts: 1,755
    Sedums are very easy to grow and propogate (just stick cuttings and bits of leaf direct into the soil!) Not happy on shady or wet soil though.

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,273
    Most spring bulbs are very obliging.  Plant them once and they come back year after year. Exceptions are most tulips and grape hyacinths.  You can buy species aka perennial tulips which will come again, but others will disappear after a few years.  Grape hyacinths aka muscari will flower for a few years then give you nothing but long floppy foliage.
  • GlenjjonesGlenjjones Posts: 57

    I planted quite a few spring bulbs in autumn, and they do look nice. went with Daffodils, Crocus' and Species Tulips, for the reason that you mention, as I want them to come back year on year.

    WillDB, I have 2 sedums, that come back each year, but I haven't had any luck with taking cuttings as yet. I'll keep trying.

  • NewBoy2NewBoy2 Posts: 1,144
    Garlic
    Never change Tigers in Mid Stream
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