Vanishing primroses.

I used to have a row of primroses about twenty feet long which I used to break up and extend on a regular basis. With the exception of one lonely plant they have all disappeared. They have not been treated any differently than any other year so I am at a loss to understand why they have gone. Could the exceptional heat of last year have anything to do with it? Your opinions would be most welcome. 
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Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 14,728
    Did you notice when they disappeared? Over the winter or before then?

    They are plants that naturally live near woodland so they might have been burned by the summer heat.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 7,844
    Lots of mine disappeared sometime last year but those in part shade on ground which is naturally damp survived unscathed, so I think pansyface has nailed it.  However, I've noticed lots of self-sown babies springing up here over the last few days, so keep a look out for any of those.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 1,783
    Mine have been eaten by pigeons
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 7,844
    Mine have been eaten by pigeons
    The woodpigeons here seem to prefer my brassicas, tree buds and anything else I've carefully nurtured although everything gets at least one 'taster' peck I reckon.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • CopperdogCopperdog Posts: 290
    I have lots of self sown primroses this spring which has been a lovely surprise.  I thought they always disappeared (ready to come back again around Feb) once they have flowered and seeded.  I can't remember seeing any in the beds through the summer?
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 7,844
    The leaves often die back completely in hot weather but the roots normally survive and then come back towards the end of the year - they are perennial.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • JellyfireJellyfire SuffolkPosts: 739
    I’d say I’ve lost about 80% of mine this year, I presume it was down to the drought last summer 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 16,788
    Not necessarily.  They grow wild in the hedgerows and roadsides here and there has been a drought each year since we bought this house in July 2016.   Cowslips too.   Maybe the strain round here is just used to shutting down in teh heat and dry and then comes back again after winter rains.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • B3B3 Posts: 9,760
    80% of mine grow in the sunny side of the garden on heavy clay which is rock hard in the summer. They come back as soon as the weather cools down and there's a bit of rain.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • The comments seem to confirm my own suspicions, many thanks to all who replied.
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