Myrtle's use for wildlife

The recent list of plants good for insects was interesting, especially as I am seeking to plant things that have wildlife value in a garden that has recently been hit by honey fungus; the latter caused the felling of a large eucalyptus. I noticed that myrtle, which is supposed to be fairly resistant to honey fungus, is listed as having protein-rich pollen and being good for hoverflies.
However, I am puzzled, since the page for Myrtle (https://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/myrtus-communis/) describes it as having 'no particular known value to wildlife in the UK'.
Is this just a mistake or are there different types of myrtle?
And can anyone suggest any other shrubs or small trees that are good for birds or insects but would survive honey fungus?


Posts

  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 2,916
    Well there's the problem with using common names not Latin ones really. There's a few plants referred to as myrtle so hard to know which one was cited in the list you saw.

    However if you're planting for wildlife then remember that pollen and nectar aren't the only source of wildlife value in plants. Always try and start with a good selection of native plants first as caterpillars need food plants to make the butterflies that rely on the nectar. Obviously it's more complex than that but you see what I mean.
  • BijdezeeBijdezee Bruges, BelgiumPosts: 707
    I lived in South Africa years ago and I grew a lovely myrtle Bush with starry white flowers followed by blue/black berries. Blackbirds loved to eat those berries so I'm wondering if it's the same in the UK? 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,551
    I have a myrtle (Myrtus communis) a lovely shrub with starry fragrant flowers then black berries which soon disappear 
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • BijdezeeBijdezee Bruges, BelgiumPosts: 707
    Pete.8 said:
    I have a myrtle (Myrtus communis) a lovely shrub with starry fragrant flowers then black berries which soon disappear 
    So birds love them here too. 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,551
    I guess so - bees feed on the pollen and birds eat the berries.
    It doesn't get smothered in flowers so I guess there are better sources of pollen and berries, but it's a lovely shrub. Just needs keeping tamed as it grows quickly
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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