Shrubs to go with Euphorbia Wulfenii

Hello everyone, I am new to this forum.  I am revamping my garden this year after a few years of partial neglect, due to various other commitments and life just getting in the way,  but now I am keen to get to grips with it and I will be hoping to pick some brains?! 

I have two flower beds beneath the windows either side of my front door, about 3m wide by 1m deep and facing west.  I already planted a Euphorbia wulfenii in each one a couple of years ago and they're doing very well, they're probably a bit big for the beds to be honest and have gone a bit leggy at the bases this year, but I love them so much I want to keep them.  I have various herbaceous perennials in the beds alongside but they always look dwarfed by the euphorbias, and to be honest I don't have much time to nurture the perennials.  I am thinking of just digging-out everything except the euphorbia and planting one or two flowering shrubs which will compliment them, will flower after the euphorbias and won't require much care apart from an annual prune/mulch. 

I love hydrangeas (they grow well in my garden) but I am worried they might get too high and obscure the windows which are about 1m from the ground, (if I prune hydrangeas too severely every spring, will they still flower?) 

I'd be very grateful for some ideas of what to plant please.  My soil is fairly clayish, but I have added so much organic matter to those beds over the years that you wouldn't really know.  I also like blues, purples and pinks, my front door is a raspberry red and I have a sturdy oak porch which has gone silver and has a healthy solanum crispum glasnevin growing up one side.

Many thanks for reading!

Lisa




Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 2,994
    There are many types of Hebes that will flower from summer into autumn time. They only need a light prune back after flowering, evergreen and generally, they are considered quite low maintenance. Nadina Domestica, also evergreen, will also work well in my opinion. Very low maintenance again, just the odd prune when you need to. Has bamboo-like leaves that colour into the winter time and if grown in a lot of sun, bright red berries in the winter time.
  • EverdeenEverdeen Posts: 3
    There are many types of Hebes that will flower from summer into autumn time. They only need a light prune back after flowering, evergreen and generally, they are considered quite low maintenance. Nadina Domestica, also evergreen, will also work well in my opinion. Very low maintenance again, just the odd prune when you need to. Has bamboo-like leaves that colour into the winter time and if grown in a lot of sun, bright red berries in the winter time.
    Thank you Borderline. I think hebes might be a good choice. I haven't heard of Nadina Domestica, I'll have to research that one! 🙂
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 1,923
    How about some contrasting euphorbias like E. Amygdaloides Purpurea or purple sedums, which are shorter than the Wulfenii and might hide their straggly bottoms.

    Maybe some shrubs with purple foliage like cotoneaster royal purple (which can be kept compact with pruning) dwarf loropetalum black pearl is hardy to -10, berberis red rocket is more plummy purple rather than red, berberis atropurpurea can get quite large but is very slow growing. I think purples and whites would look good with the acid green of euphorbia, but not sure about pink, might clash with your raspberry door.

    Easy-care perennials like flat-topped white achillea plus the tall white spires of liatris alba might create some nice contrast with the Wulf foliage.

    I find I can grow many plants in my alkaline clay (including nandinas that prefer acid soil) because its well-amended with ericaceous compost and lots and lots of grit. 
  • EverdeenEverdeen Posts: 3
    Nollie said:
    How about some contrasting euphorbias like E. Amygdaloides Purpurea or purple sedums, which are shorter than the Wulfenii and might hide their straggly bottoms.

    Maybe some shrubs with purple foliage like cotoneaster royal purple (which can be kept compact with pruning) dwarf loropetalum black pearl is hardy to -10, berberis red rocket is more plummy purple rather than red, berberis atropurpurea can get quite large but is very slow growing. I think purples and whites would look good with the acid green of euphorbia, but not sure about pink, might clash with your raspberry door.

    Easy-care perennials like flat-topped white achillea plus the tall white spires of liatris alba might create some nice contrast with the Wulf foliage.

    I find I can grow many plants in my alkaline clay (including nandinas that prefer acid soil) because its well-amended with ericaceous compost and lots and lots of grit. 
    Thank you Nollie! Lots for me research there, I like the idea of more Euphorbia and purple foliage too! I'm on the South Coast of the UK, near the sea and sheltered by the Isle of Wight so we rarely get harsh winters.
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