Irish moss peat

purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 1,072
While clearing the shed I found a bag of Irish moss peat left by the previous owners. I know it's at least four years old and was going to dump it, but thought as I hate to waste things I would check with you all first. As it's so old would I be in danger of adding something bad to my new veg bed if it was mixed in with soil and compost? Thanks in advance as all help gratefully received. 🙂
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Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 19,484
    isn't peat millions of years old before it's put into the bag?
    I'd add it happily.
    Devon.
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 1,072
    It's not the peat but what could grow on it that I wondered about @Hostafan1.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 19,484
    I'd not worry about it. If you are, add it to the compost bin and let nature deal with it there.
    Devon.
  • RubytooRubytoo On the sofa, Southerly aspect.Posts: 751
    edited 15 March
    Is it mouldy or manky in any way?
    I think it may be on the acidic side, not sure how much.
    It used to be sold  and used as a soil conditioner as much as in potting mixes.
    Something to acidify the soil for more ericaceous plants.
    Bear that in mind for your veggies?

    But if it is only a bit and you are mixing with other stuff anyway, use it up.
    Even if it was a bit manky I would still use it, or compost it though it is already.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 50,732
    Peat bogs aren’t sterile ... use if up, it’d be such a shame to waste it. 
    'There's a flower that shall be mine, 'tis the little celandine.' W Wordsworth





  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,128
    Hostafan1 said:
    I'd not worry about it. If you are, add it to the compost bin and let nature deal with it there.
    I agree.
    I've been clearing my sheds and garage - yesterday I found several bags of John Innes compost that had been there for around 20 years (I'd used them to support a workbench). It was very dry and compacted but I've chucked them around the garden
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • treehugger80treehugger80 Posts: 1,720
    you could use them to top dress beds around shrubs, worms will drag any organic matter into the ground so you don't have to dig and if you lay it deep enough it'll ask as a weed suppressant
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 1,072
    Good ideas all round thankyou. As I don't like to waste anything it's going in as it will end up being only about 15% of mix even if it is a bit acidic my alkaline soil will neutralise it. Just a thought if it is acidic maybe I could use a bit to make up a pot of lily of the valley as they dont grow well here.🤔🙂
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 2,945
    Hostafan1 said:
    isn't peat millions of years old before it's put into the bag?
    I'd add it happily.
    A bit like the bottles of spring water who advertise the fact that it's taken millions of years to percolate through rocks, but put a 'Best before date' on the bottle. :-)
  • cornellycornelly Posts: 543
    Put it on the potato plot they like it a little acidic.
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