Help planning very narrow border

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Posts

  • AmphibiosAmphibios Posts: 23
    Oooh Lizzie how lovely! I’m definitely keeping those pics for inspiration. 

    It sounds like what everyone is saying is work on the structure and the soil and not plant anything until I have bigger borders and everything arranged how I want it? 

    I guess I’m starting to understand that gardening is a super long game.

    I have a concrete monster I discovered in the front garden that I have to sort, so I was hoping to have some pretty things in the back garden before planning the grand upheaval of it. 

    What about some annual wildflowers - I have a packet I was hoping to sow in the front garden before I realised it was badly lain paving stones on top of concrete  :'( :'(
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 3,040
    You are learning Amphibios - gardening is the long game !! It's best to plan, get inspired by photos like those on here, and then prepare. If you've got some seeds and you want some colour for this year (while you're planning ;) ), then by all means sow them. Just make sure you prepare the ground, get rid of any big stones, weeds etc. before you sow, to give them the best chance. You've definitely come to the right place for advice !  :)
  • AmphibiosAmphibios Posts: 23
    Perki said:
    Should be fine with pervoskia , try planting with salvia carrodonna and alchemilla mollies for late spring summer and Pervoskia with verbena Bonarises for late summer /autumn . you can added allium / other bulbs like crocus etc , allum nigrum would look good with salvia as do must other alliums . Getting suitable height will be the biggest problem maybe a climbing roses trained across it ? All the plants I've mentioned can be substituted for something else like nepata - Erysium B maulve for the salvia etc. I'll leave you to it football started  :)  
    Thank you I have pinned the suggestions verbena Bonariensis is gorgeous! 
  • AmphibiosAmphibios Posts: 23
    AnniD said:
    You are learning Amphibios - gardening is the long game !! It's best to plan, get inspired by photos like those on here, and then prepare. If you've got some seeds and you want some colour for this year (while you're planning ;) ), then by all means sow them. Just make sure you prepare the ground, get rid of any big stones, weeds etc. before you sow, to give them the best chance. You've definitely come to the right place for advice !  :)
    Yes, after learning what hard work gardening is I wanted a bit of payoff to keep me motivated. 

    I’ll just be a little more modest for now. 

    I’ve learnt so much in just a month that it’s probably best to have little projects.

    This way I’ll get a better idea of what I like and what suits my garden in the long term. 

    Thanks again everyone for all the sage advice A x
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 12,202
    I wouldn’t sow any seeds this year, how will you prepare your ground and lift your slabs or enrich your soil if you have seeds germinating.
    Up to you of course, but I would just put a few tubs around to cheer it up and get cracking on the structural side. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 
    Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose. 
  • DampGardenManDampGardenMan Posts: 895
    Lyn said:
    there’s too much grass, OH doesn’t fancy digging any more beds

    You could always go the no-dig route and cover the desired areas with ground membrane/cardboard/compost/whatever and make new beds without wrecking OH's back :)
  • FlinsterFlinster Posts: 615
    Look up long narrow gardens on Pinterest for inspiration you will be amazed what can be achieved! I totally understand your need for some quick wins- maybe throw some raised beds  together with some cheap gravel boards and get some annuals in for a season of colour while you plan. It is really, really worth planning because sometimes once you start it seems even harder to make changes! Be brave in your decisions and put down what you want rather than trying to work around what you have it will be worth the wait!
  • MarlorenaMarlorena Posts: 1,529
    Please don't be concerned about narrow borders or narrow paths... I'm used to it and I'm well on the wrong side of 'young'..
    This planted border on the right is 2 foot wide narrowing to just 1 foot width further along you go.... I like narrow paths, you have to fight your way through... all good fun.!..


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,264
    I'd agree with everything Lyn has said. Don't rush into anything until you've decided what you really want from the garden. Getting a decent layout to start with is the most important thing because it's even harder to change once you start planting it up. Then decide on the type of look you want, and the type of plants that will suit your conditions. Many people make the mistake of saying 'I'd like a cottage garden' but they don't have the time to devote to it, or they want all sorts of tender, or jungly plants, but their climate and conditions won't support it,and they don't have a greenhouse. 

    I was wondering if you would post pix of that garden too, BL. It shows how effective you can make along narrow  space, and make it somewhere you'd really want to be.

    You have to make the garden appealing - you won't go to the end of a long plot if there isn't something to entice  you down there  :)
    Oh the devil in me said, go down to the shed
    I know where I belong

  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen SpainPosts: 1,283
    Im not sure with that width you will get much ‘behind’ anything else, but if you plant in a shallow zig-zag pattern you will get some degree of overlapping and blending. I would choose just two plants (but you dont have to) a tall one for the back zag and a shorter/spreading or airy plant for the front zig in a contrasting colour and flower form.

    Some coneflowers/echinaceas are quite short, others and rudbeckies can get very much taller and there is a huge colour range to choose from. I grow an intense fuchsia pink echinacia that is only around 30cm high, as well as the much taller E. Magnus Superior.

    Verbena Bonariensis, Perovskia, Gaura Whirling Butterflies and Gypsophila are all nice airy plants in the purple/pink/white palette that will overlap the coneflowers a bit without obscuring them. 

    Coneflowers are late summer bloomers so as well as thinking about plant form, height and shape, perhaps pick an early-flowering companion so you have something to look at while you are waiting on the coneflowers. 

    If your soil is clay, most of the plants mentioned so far will grow fine on clay (I have clay and grow most of them) but they do like do like good drainage, so dig in lots of grit and compost right the way along the length to loosen the soil texture up a bit - don’t just add to individual planting holes otherwise you create mini sumps for water to collect, which is the opposite to what you want to achieve!
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