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Appreciating what you have.

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  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,627
    Both my grandparents went though confusion and anger at times depending on how bad things got. It's sadly not the blissful ignorance you'd hope for.

    I do a bit of work with a carehome company though who are fitting out specialist units for dementia care and the level of thought that goes into the homes now in terms of layout and decor is world above how it used to be. The corridors are set out like streets with front doors to the rooms, and shops and communal areas. I'd still rather pray for a cure before my marbles go though.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,971

    This was mentioned in a recent newspaper story as a new idea to help people with dementia stay calm.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,829
    I was so lucky with my parents, mum at 88 and dad at 92 both kept their memories until the end.  For that I will be forever thankful. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,627
    I wish even half the things on that list were true for me :|
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 4,700
    Lyn said:
    I was so lucky with my parents, mum at 88 and dad at 92 both kept their memories until the end.  For that I will be forever thankful. 

    My parents too.  Physical limitations do get me down at times, despite them not being too severe.  The thought of mental impairment is a route I want to consider.
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 4,053
    My Dad was compos mentis to the end, but couldn't speak and was physically very disabled so had to go into a home after Mum died. Most people in the home had some form of dementia. He generally kept to his room but when OH and I visited one or other of us would usually pop into the communal areas to get a cup of tea. We always took our dogs with us - Dad loved them - and one time I was taking the cups back so had our greyhound with us as I walked through the dining room. A lady stopped me, made a big fuss of the dog (who loved all people) and spoke to me about how hard life can be for racing greys, and about the dog she'd had. She was very kind and completely coherent. I'd seen her many times before (and after) in the home shouting and swearing at the staff and other residents and even her visitors. How sad that I'd seen a flash of her true personality that I suspect her family hadn't in some time.

    There was a Pets as Therapy dog visiting there regularly, I hope she got to see him often.
    “It's not worth doing something unless someone, somewhere, would much rather you weren't doing it.” ― Terry Pratchett
  • A good friend of mine has three gorgeous Golden Retrievers; the two elder ones (one bitch, one dog) are both 'actively employed' as Pets as Therapy dogs - visiting a number of residential homes in the county. The youngster is 'in training' and she too will soon join the others on their regular outings. Additionally they are all 'listening dogs' who help youngsters with their reading skills in classroom visits to Junior schools. Their owner and others form a countywide network of willing volunteers who offer their services on a systematic basis throughout Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire.
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