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Please help fill the gap.

Hi.
It's my first attempt at gardening this year and I have a North West facing corner that gets a decent amount of sun from mid afternoon that it my first area to work on.

I have added some trellis and Jasmin trachelospermum to climb it, but there is a space in front in the earth for possibly a couple more plants. Ideally they would fill the soil. Could anyone recommend a couple of plants that would sit nicely together in this gap? Thanks a lot. 




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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,993
    Hi - is it perennials you want, or shrubs? 
    You'll need to bear in mind access for the climber for pruning, tying in etc.
    There are plenty of plants which will suit though, as well as some spring bulbs for this time of year   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Thanks. Either a perennial or shrub would be fine. Something not too too with the access you mentioned. I think I would steer clear of bulbs as i could put those in pots in front. 
    Would a magnolia be a good choice? Having it ever green would be a bonus? I think the gap is big enough for two plants possibly. 
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,135
    Sarcococca confusa (Sweet box) would do OK there.It is evergreen and the flowers,which are out right now,smell divine!

    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • Thanks, they look lovely!
  • This might seem like a silly question but the plants for sale are usually quite small. If you have a big gap do you but 2 or 3 and place them next to eachother or just one and hope it grows quickly :)
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 63,790
    And if you cut a sprig and put it in a vase it’ll perfume the whole room  <3
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,135
    edited February 2019
    This might seem like a silly question but the plants for sale are usually quite small. If you have a big gap do you but 2 or 3 and place them next to each other or just one and hope it grows quickly :)
    It is best to get smaller plants that will grow better to fit the space.Sacococca grows fairly quickly and can be pruned quite hard if need be.
    Gardening is all about patience!!
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,993
    You really need to take into account the eventual size of a plant before planting it, otherwise you'll be forever pruning to keep it fitting the space. That will be the issue with evergreens, generally speaking. It's better to plant one shrub and let it grow. It's not a big space you have there.However, another good shrub is Osmanthus burkwoodii , which also has nice little flowers - not unlike the Sarcococca. I have that, and it's easy to keep to a smaller size. 

    I'd be inclined to have evergreen ground cover and a couple of perennials, or just perennials, rather than bigger shrubs though, as anything big will encroach too much on the jasmine, and block the light it needs to do well.
    They aren't hardy here, so I can't comment on their maintenance, but anything else you plant will also use up nutrients and water, so bearthat in mind too. 



    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • That sounds great. So perhaps Osmanthus burkwoodii as the perennial. For the ground cover Candytuft (Iberis sempervirens) and Creeping phlox (Phlox subulata)? 
    Both look lovely in an 'evergreen ground cover' google search, but neither of which I know anything about! 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 33,993
    Osmanthus is  a shrub, slowish growing, but easily maintained. The Sarcococca is equally straightforward. 
    The Phlox and Iberis are also easy, but I'd stick some early bulbs in there too - they'll grow up through the low growing stuff and add to the seasonal interest, especially while the other plants mature. Crocus, snowdrops, species tulips etc. You can add colour with the crocus/tulips if you don't want it all white  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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