Lawn scarifying

My lawn is thick with thatch and moss.  When is the best time to scarify?  and what is the process?  Do I cut first (not been cut this year yet), how long after scarifying can I / should I apply weed and feed.  Anything else I need to consider?
Thanks in advance.
«1

Posts

  • GartenerGartener South EastPosts: 80
    I have this on my To-Do list as well, so marking the place from those experienced.

    From what I ve researched on line, here’s the sequence of things:

    1. Apply some moss killer and leave for a few days.
    2. Cut the lawn on a dry~ish day.
    3. If needed, Sweep away all the leaves & debris.
    4. Scarify with a spring tine rake.
    5. Aerate 
    6. Topdress (incl. Fertiliser)
    7. Over seed
    8. Water

    I am waiting till April, when the temp is a bit better and some rain clouds around. Good Luck!
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,845
    Good advise from Umair, I would add that you make sure you use the moss/weed killer exactly as instructed on the box, weigh it out exactly as it says,  so many people on here come back and say everything’s gone black and it’s killed the lawn.  Don’t let it get on your flower beds. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 24,400
    Another good method is to feed only initially. If I do that,  I do it in March. On a dry day [that can be tricky here!] give it a cut, and then proceed with scarifying etc.

    It has the benefit of getting everything growing, including weeds, and it then means the weed and feed is more effective. The grass gets an early boost, especially when the moss has taken over a bit. Mine looks largely moss at this time of year :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,845
    Mine’s all moss too, same every year! Comes of living in a damp area. Don’t know why we bother to treat it, someone wants to come back to stay just so she can walk barefoot on the bed of moss😀
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • treehugger80treehugger80 Posts: 1,827
    be aware when spreading the moss killer that you're careful where you walk, it can stick to your shoes.
    also if its really thick then think about hiring a power scarifyer, it much less back breaking.
    plus you could give it a go over now and get quite a lot of the thick out (and use it for lining hanging baskets) before you apply moss killer.
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 4,407
    Agreecwith advice as above, OH is helping my dad sort out his front lawn at present,  it was full of moss and generally looking pretty tatty. Dad reckons it's looking better already,  but he is a glass half full kind of person !
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,415
    Thanks for the advice.  I do have a wheeled weed / feed applicator which I've used successfully in the past so using too much shouldn't be a problem.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,845
    KT53 said:
    Thanks for the advice.  I do have a wheeled weed / feed applicator which I've used successfully in the past so using too much shouldn't be a problem.
    We have one of those but be careful it shoots it out of the side in a wide arc and could get into your borders. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 24,400
    I've got an excess of moss everywhere too,  Lyn and not just in the grass!   :D

    I like a reasonable area of grass though, so it comes down to personal preference re treatment. I don't have a big garden, and as long as the front 'grass' looks relatively tidy, I don't mind, so I don't go overboard with treatment. Some years it gets nothing other than regular cutting. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,415
    Lyn said:
    KT53 said:
    Thanks for the advice.  I do have a wheeled weed / feed applicator which I've used successfully in the past so using too much shouldn't be a problem.
    We have one of those but be careful it shoots it out of the side in a wide arc and could get into your borders. 
    Mine feeds out of holes in the base rather than the rotating 'spray' type to which I think you are referring.  I have more problem spotting the line of the wheels to ensure I don't miss any areas.
Sign In or Register to comment.