Forum home Problem solving

Climbing hydrangea

Can anyone confirm what this plant is? I think it’s an evergreen climbing hydrangea buts it’s not flowered in 3 years. I repotted it last summer but recently it’s not looked very happy. Leaves are droopy and looks like something’s eating it maybe? Could someone give a little advice on what could be wrong with it? It is in a sheltered position and mostly in shade, but the top does get direct sun light. Many thanks  

Posts

  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 11,011
    I did think it could be clematis armandii. If it is, it really should be in the ground, and also probably in a sunny position. Whatever it is, in spite of your best efforts, that pot just isn't big enough l'm afraid. 
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,869
    I think it's the Hydrangea, can't remember the precise name. I've had one for about 10 years and never seen a flower yet. Time to get something else I think :) It needs more rootspace though
  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 11,011
    Is it hydrangea Seemannii @nutcutlet ?
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,869
    edited February 2019
    I think it is, Anni, and I'm not sure it is the same as mine exactly. I think mine is Hydrangea petiolaris (as it was then) with a cultivar name
    got it, 

    Hydrangea anomala subs anomala 'Winter Surprise'

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,869
    edited February 2019


  • FlinsterFlinster Posts: 883
    In terms of what’s eating it, it looks very like vine weevil damage.
  • Tom68Tom68 Posts: 20
    Thanks all, looks like I’ve got a nice excuse to go buy myself a big pot! is it common for them not to flower if not in sun then? It’s just starting to reach more sunlight so hopefully this summer it’ll be happier. How do I treat vine weevil? 
  • FlinsterFlinster Posts: 883
    Well if you are repotting it then you need to get as much of the soil off the roots as you can. You may see small white C shaped grubs- they are weevil grubs. They pupate into adults who take the notches out of the leaves- they lay eggs in the soil and the grubs eat the roots. You can buy nematodes for open soil, or there are products such as Bug Clear vine weevil killer which kill the grubs and adults as the chemical is systemic. Pots are more prone to vine weevil. The adults are nocturnal so you can do evening searches for them and squish. If you go down chemical route I THINK you treat around April and again late summer. You might want to look at evidence which suggests the chemical may be harmful to bees- I’m not sure how much recent research has been done on this- perhaps someone else does. Do be vigilant though as the weevils can cause extensive damage with some plants more susceptible than others!
  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,871
    Nematodes work well in pots as well as in the open ground.  The active ingredient in the systemic chemical killer is acetamoprid, a neonicotinoid which disrupts the nervous system of insects.  Some "neonics" have been banned, because they cause serious damage to bees; the manufacturers claim this current one is "safer", but the jury is still out.  Some studies, as Flinster says, suggest it's not as safe as all that...
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
Sign In or Register to comment.