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Have I planted these two trees too close together?

jamesharcourtjamesharcourt West SussexPosts: 465
See below, I've drawn arrows to two Japanese Maples - an Osakazuki on the left and an Atropropurerum on the right.  

I originally wanted the Osakazuki to grow biggest in that space to replace another 8-10' spiky tree thing we had there before, but recently moved the Atropropureum there.

I'd be happy to prune a bit to keep the Atro as a lower item and to grow away from the Osakazuki but just wondering what other folk think.  I'm not going for a specimen look here, more of a woodland area as it's north-facing.


Posts

  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Scariff, County Clare, IrelandPosts: 7,850
    Ultimate height & spread of Acer palmatum 'Atropurpureum' is 4 to 8 metres, according to the RHS.  So I'd say yes, they are too close together...  'Osakazuki' is great as a specimen tree, when you can see its fabulous autumn colour better.   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 13,025
    You seem to have several other trees very close together. I don't think it will be long before they are all encroaching rather badly on each other.
    There are ashtrays of emulsion,
    for the fag ends of the aristocracy.
  • jamesharcourtjamesharcourt West SussexPosts: 465
    Some of those trees are already at full maturity @punkdoc ... the one behind is a plum (well two, really close together, which were here when we moved in) ... and the Xmas trees down the back are really straight and upright.

    There is a magnolia galaxy which forms a triangle with the two Acers ... but other than that it's just the tree fern which won't really grow much ...
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 13,025
    Hope you are right, if so, they should look good.
    I would certainly remove one of the Acers.
    There are ashtrays of emulsion,
    for the fag ends of the aristocracy.
  • If you are after shade, you need to move one of them or they will fight for space and look very poor because of it.
  • jamesharcourtjamesharcourt West SussexPosts: 465
    If you are after shade, you need to move one of them or they will fight for space and look very poor because of it.
    Thanks.  

    My goal here isn’t to achieve shade more to accommodate, really.

    My solution is going to be to prune / train the Atroptoureum on the right to stay no more than about 4’ high and wide - and let the single stemmed  Osakazuki grow unchecked.  


  • LTobyLToby Posts: 184
    edited February 2019
    You are in the right direction, jamesharcourt! You have plans for a mature canopy style-tree shades? They can create such canopy if you let them grow. As they will mature you can eventually trim the crowns of those that will crowd together but that will depend on your intended purpose.

    At this stage, determine which of those trees may have the biggest spread from medium to max heights and see if your plans will play out as you are imagining. That is the art of gardening and creating spaces. 

    Visual appeal of trees with consideration of their heights and spreads, foliage colour transformation during a given season, blooms and visibility are great factors when planting them including which one thrives best under sun or in dappled shade. Noticed of some shrubs underneath the trees too ... those are fun too. There are so many choices for colourful shrubs (foliage and blooms) that grow in dappled shades of trees.

    Have fun with your gardening ...
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
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