Ideas for Office Plant

guttiesgutties N. IrelandPosts: 200
I've moved into a new office at work and it's quite bare.
I'd like to brighten it up with a plant (or flower) or two to sit on a sideboard.

Any ideas appreciated.

Posts

  • Go for hedge trees. I have recently planted cherry laurel hedge tree which produces white creamy aromatic flowers. Not only this its edible fruits attracts wildlife. I love chirping sound of birds. 
  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 800
    Birds in your office, @gutties?

    What sort of light levels does your office have? Will the plant be near a window? Knowing these things will help to suggest suitable plants.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 2,924
    What are the conditions like in terms of light and heat? Offices can be tough on plants as they get cold at night and often don't have a lot of natural light. Aspidistra is a popular choice because it doesn't mind cold and shade, and will tolerate getting dry when you're on holiday. Sansevieria likes it a bit brighter but will tolerate shade. Peace lily is always good if it doesn't get too cold in there. 


  • guttiesgutties N. IrelandPosts: 200
    edited 7 February
    Light is OKish as the external wall is floor to ceiling glass; however the window is North-West facing so I never get any direct sunlight.
    The office is temperature controlled (set at 21 degrees) and it's a brand new build so it'll not get too cold at night time.

    I'm situating the plants on a sideboard which would be halfway along one wall.

    And I don't get any birds in the office.
  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 800
    I have a parlour palm and a dracaena in a room which doesn't get direct sunlight and they both do well and can tolerate a bit of neglect. I have a peace lily as well but it doesn't handle neglect quite as well (although I haven't actually managed to kill it yet!).
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 2,924
    A Epipremnum aureum (golden pothos) would look good trailing down the side of the sideboard nearest the window. English ivy is also supposed to work well if the office isn't too hot and they're a great air purifier like the peace lily.
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 1,252

    My office is similar-ish - modern climate control (I set it at 20 but sometimes it gets turned up a bit when I'm not there!) with two tall but narrow windows facing south-east, with blinds that we close when there's direct sun.

    I have a Sanseveria, a Ficus benjamina and a Dracaena marginata on the floor, and on my desk I have a Dieffenbachia and a maranta-type thing which I believe is Ctenanthe burle-marxii (but it's ancestor was labelled "foliage plant" when I bought it so I'm not 100% sure). 

    All are doing well.  The ficus is shedding some leaves but I only brought it from home a few weeks ago so I think it's still settling in.  I have parents/siblings/offspring of all of them except the dieffenbachia at home and they do well there too, so pretty tolerant.

    The ZZ plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia) is extremely tolerant. I have it in a dark shady corner at home where everything else I've tried has failed, and it has doubled in height and width in a couple of years.

  • guttiesgutties N. IrelandPosts: 200
    Thanks all.  Certainly a few ideas there for me to try.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,007
    I can recommend Peperomia Graveolens, a succulent plant that is very adaptable. Happy in sun but also in semi shade and under artificial light. Really thick glossy dark green leaves with contrasting red to orange backs making it a nice desk-top or side-board plant. No need to water lots, just water from the base, and they grow quite fast and can get to nearly 1 feet tall.

    Another plant I found quite easy to care for is Pilea Peperomoides. Was given to me last year as a Birthday present, it's done really well in sun and also in partial sun. So far, it's thrown out loads of baby plants from the base, and I have already cut them off and re-potted them and they have all done well too. 
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 2,924
    Tradescantia pallida purple heart would also be a good option. It grows well for me in the house with very little fuss, you can propagate it easily too. I like to grow it in with taller plants and let it cascade around the base of the pot.

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