Ideas to cover a fence

Hi,

I am after yet more advice and suggestions.

Our house backs on to a very large wood (great for nature and red squirrels), However our border line is a rather unsightly fence consisting of wire sheep fencing, chicken wire and a wooden rail on the top.

The area naturally is very dry , clay based soil and most of it does not get long hours of natural light.

Is there anything that I can plant that will grow into the fence / wire so to speak and is a evergreen , like say Ivy would and survive in these conditions

I am looking for something different other than your usual hedging and that does not need tlc.

Any advice would be gratefully received.


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Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 2,613
    It's hard to picture your fence. Also, how cold can it get in the winter time? Some evergreen climber/shrubs are not always hardy. Helps to know when recommending. Clematis Armandii is a strong climber and will eventually smother your back wall/fence, and all you need to do is thin it out after 3 years. Lonicera Japonica is also a strong grower, capable of growing almost like a shrub if left unpruned eventually.
  • George2019George2019 Posts: 12
    It's hard to picture your fence. Also, how cold can it get in the winter time? Some evergreen climber/shrubs are not always hardy. Helps to know when recommending. Clematis Armandii is a strong climber and will eventually smother your back wall/fence, and all you need to do is thin it out after 3 years. Lonicera Japonica is also a strong grower, capable of growing almost like a shrub if left unpruned eventually.
    It can do up here in the rural North East (-13 the other day). The ground around it is naturally very dry and hard due to the trees taking all the water up. and is well covered by the trees so it does not get much watering from the rain

    Thank you for your ideas
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 2,585
    I think you've got your answer when you mentioned ivy. Native ivy is tough as old boots and would complement your woodland setting, being also good for wildlife. If you wanted to add some interest, there are lots of different cultivated ivies which you could alternate with the native ones.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 2,613
    If the soil is possibly drier due to the trees, I think Pileostegia Viburnoides might do well. A bit slow to start with, but once established, will remain evergreen and flowers for long periods from mid summer into autumn. It would suit with your woodland background.
  • George2019George2019 Posts: 12
    Thanks for all the responses, I will try and get a photo of the area so you can see what I am on about
  • George2019George2019 Posts: 12
    Thank you all so much for your ideas and suggestions.

    Sorry for the delay in getting a photo of said fence uploaded. This is what I am wanting to cover with something. 

    Would something like bramble bushes grow next to it, bearing in mind how dry the ground can get?

    Lizzie27 said:
    I think you've got your answer when you mentioned ivy. Native ivy is tough as old boots and would complement your woodland setting, being also good for wildlife. If you wanted to add some interest, there are lots of different cultivated ivies which you could alternate with the native ones.
    Lizzie27, I think I may of, I am useless at names of plants etc, I buy ones I like the look of. So Ivy was just the kind of plant I had in mind.  :)

  • LiriodendronLiriodendron Todmorden, West YorksPosts: 4,983
    That's a fab bit of woodland to look out onto, George!   :)
    "The one who plants trees, knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life."  Rabindranath Tagore
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 1,687
    Agree with @Liriodendron and I would add IMHO there is no need to "cover that fence". It looks OK to me!
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 2,585
    Now that I've seen your photo, I wouldn't try to cover that fence either. You have a beautiful view into the wood and it's wildlife. If you wanted though to break up the expanse, I would suggest that you plant a couple of biggish shade loving shrubs here and there away from the fence by at least 4-5 ft. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,265
    I wouldn't cover it either. 
    Brambles will certainly grow anywhere, but you won't be adding anything worthwhile to the surroundings by planting them. As Lizzie says - you could plant a few shrubs - berrying types perhaps like Berberis, Holly, Mahonia and Pyracantha - but they'd need to be planted far enough out from any tree roots to get them established, and they'd need a bit of help to get them going.

    Leaving the space open means you can see wildlife coming and going more easily though.  :)
    Oh the devil in me said, go down to the shed
    I know where I belong

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