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Brand new garden - new some help please!

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  • I would also make the borders different shapes on the two long sides of the garden. Wider on one side too.
  • purplerallimpurplerallim LincolnshirePosts: 3,892
    Or another idea is to make the lawn run diagonally from door to tree making the tree a feature. The corner nearest the house would make a good sized bed and around the shed you could make a child's area. This would make the garden look longer. You could even alter the shape of the patio to match just moving some slabs. Just an idea.😁
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 5,150
    In the first instance, the tree is badly sited... too close to the fence, it seems no more than 2 foot away from it, and too close to the house over the fence, who appear to have a small garden... I don't think I would like that..

    I'd have to saw it down to about 10 foot and replant it, more centrally and more within my own garden than on the edge... although it's tall I think it's still doable..
  • steephillsteephill Posts: 1,970
    A word of warning - new-build gardens are notorious for having builders rubbish buried under all that new grass so don't be surprised if you find some unwelcome bits once you get started. I would hasten to add that this is not a new phenomenon but has been going on for decades. It can be very off-putting to discover this stuff but if you do find it get it out and you will be starting from a proper clean sheet.

  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 8,099
    Good point that steephill. Ours was a new build 30 years ago. The back garden was part of the route for the dumper trucks, so they had laid a path of scalpings (?) right across the middle of it - then laid turf over what seemed to be 1/2 inch of topsoil. We collected as many of the stones as we could and used them to fill the base of the greenhouse before filling with concrete. All these years on, l am still coming across them !
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,089
    Agree with @Marlorena that that tree seems located too close to the fence. But strongly disagree about her suggestion to saw it down. 
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • Marlorena said:
    In the first instance, the tree is badly sited... too close to the fence, it seems no more than 2 foot away from it, and too close to the house over the fence, who appear to have a small garden... I don't think I would like that..

    I'd have to saw it down to about 10 foot and replant it, more centrally and more within my own garden than on the edge... although it's tall I think it's still doable..
    Yes it is close to the fence, we sadly didn't plant it. But always find it difficult to saw a tree down.

    The house over the fence does not have a garden there, its there parking  
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 5,150
    Oh yes it's ok to do that, although I doubt the member would wish to do so... I had a tree surgeon in to do mine as the tree was much larger...
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 7,569
    Hello Jamie, Welcome to the forum.  Nice houses and as you say, a reasonably sized garden (and flat!).  I would be inclined to plant another two birch trees, one in front of the other dormer window of the house opposite and a third in the middle of their big glass staircase window (?), planting out the middle birch tree towards you a bit so all three trees are not in a straight line. You could also plan in a wriggly path in and around them to make the garden more interesting for your son and dog if you wished.  If you can get hold of multi-branched birches, so much the better as they will shield you more from the house opposite and won't grow so tall. All three (and the rest of your new planting) will need a lot of regular watering throughout the year. There are different varieties of birches, some with whiter trunks than others, so do some online research first before buying. They'd look spectacular against the dark house behind.
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,089
    I'm afraid clumps of 3 birch trees is very out-dated. They seem to be a standard feature of small front gardens of houses dating back to the 1970s around where I live. What makes things worse is when, in the course of years, such birches have grown too tall for the space allocated to them and they are horribly mutilated. 
    Hope the OP can consider alternative species. Of course "each to their own". ;)
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
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