What are the figures related to the temperature gain using tealight candles in a greenhouse?

elderberryelderberry Posts: 64
I've read a of about people swearing that tealight candles can effectively heat a greenhouse, but I've not seen any reliable figures quoted. My gut feeling is that unless you have dozens of tealight, it won't make much difference, but there's plenty of people who swear by this method, so I'm ready to be corrected. So just what are the figures related to the temperature gain using tealight candles in a greenhouse?


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Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,001
    Depends on the outside temperature, wind, humidity etc
    I found some info here
    It's not something I'd try

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Del_GriffithDel_Griffith Posts: 140
    It's on the internet so it must be true!

    Silly idea...
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 50,083
    There’s also a lot of folk on t’internet swearing that the earth is flat ...  :/ :s
    'There's a flower that shall be mine, 'tis the little celandine.' W Wordsworth





  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 12,600
    Even if it did work, the average tealight lasts four hours. Unless you are going to get up in the middle of the night to light new ones, they have gone out by the coldest part of the night. Same problem that I had with a paraffin heater. You could guarantee it would run out on the coldest night of the year, and you woke up to find the pelargoniums frozen.
    Adventures before Alzheimers.
  • elderberryelderberry Posts: 64
    Pete.8 said:
    Depends on the outside temperature, wind, humidity etc
    I found some info here
    It's not something I'd try

    Thanks for the link, although the authoritative tone it takes is not matched by the facts it presents, for example: "One tea candle can produce around 30 watts of heat" is incorrect, because watts are a measure of power, not of heat. If this is wrong, what else have they got wrong?
  • elderberryelderberry Posts: 64
    Even if it did work, the average tealight lasts four hours. Unless you are going to get up in the middle of the night to light new ones, they have gone out by the coldest part of the night. Same problem that I had with a paraffin heater. You could guarantee it would run out on the coldest night of the year, and you woke up to find the pelargoniums frozen.

    I'm told you can get 8 hour tealights.
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 1,539

    I'm told you can get 8 hour tealights.
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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 14,800
    Maybe, at a stretch, if you covered a couple of bricks with lit tealights they would transfer some heat to the bricks and thus leave residual heat but you'd need an awful lot and I can't see it doing anything better than keeping even a small greenhouse more than a degree or two warmer.

    Better, I think, to insulate the GH with bubble wrap.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,001
    Maybe worth bearing in mind that candles (paraffin wax) give off the same sort of toxic fumes that a diesel engine produces - so you'll need good ventilation which will rather defeat the object.
    A lot of them will also increase humidity.

    In my humble opinion it's not a good idea
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • elderberryelderberry Posts: 64
    Pete.8 said:
    Maybe worth bearing in mind that candles (paraffin wax) give off the same sort of toxic fumes that a diesel engine produces - so you'll need good ventilation
    That's worrying, since the candles are sold for household use.


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